The original campus of the historic Mississippi Industrial College that closed in 1982, located in Holly Springs, Mississippi.

HOLLY SPRINGS, MS – Rust College has announced the receipt of a large grant that will aid in the restoration of Mississippi Industrial College (MIC), an HBCU which closed in 1980s. The National Park Service recently awarded $16.2M in grants to help preserve African American civil rights history. Of the $16.2 million, Rust College has been awarded $500,000 for the restoration of the historic Carnegie Hall which sits on the campus of MIC. MIC, which is located adjacent to the campus of Rust College, closed in the 1980s and the building have since stood unoccupied and deteriorating. In 1979, a short time before the doors to MIC closed, four of the buildings – including Carnegie Hall, – were entered in the National Register of Historic Places. In 2008, Rust College assumed control of the buildings in an attempt to save them from further deterioration. Since President Taylor’s arrival in 2020, it has been her vision to restore the MIC campus back to life and make it part of the Rust College campus community.

Carnegie Hall has major architectural and social significance in the state of Mississippi. Originally funded by a donation from Andrew Carnegie, Carnegie Hall was built in 1923 and contained the largest auditorium and performance venue in Mississippi that was open to blacks and it was known as the Carnegie Auditorium. Even in its current condition, Carnegie Auditorium remains one of the best examples of Colonial Revival architecture in Holly Springs, Mississippi. An earlier stabilization project at Carnegie Hall was funded in part by a Mississippi Department of Archives and Heritage Community Heritage Grant.

Ivy R. Taylor, Rust College President

“The intertwined histories of Rust College and MIC are worthy of preservation. These recent awards, including $155,000 for a campus masterplan focused on preserving Rust College’s historic assets are welcome investments in the past and the future of these HBCUs. Our students and the entire Holly Springs community will benefit from a restored Carnegie Auditorium to showcase the area’s artistic and cultural heritage,” said President Ivy R. Taylor.

Earlier this spring, Rust College received its first congressional special project appropriation recommended by Senator Roger Wicker. This $1 million allocation was awarded to facilitate creation of the Ida B. Wells Social Justice and Interpretive Center on the MIC campus in the Booker T. Washington Hall building, which is also on the National Register of Historic Places. These efforts are both apart of President Taylor’s larger vision to restore the MIC campus which will be a $35+ million-dollar renovation with the potential to offer new and innovative academic programming to Rust College students, and to serve as a place to restore the arts and meet the needs of the Holly Springs community and surrounding area.

“The African American Civil Rights grants are critical to helping preserve and interpret a more comprehensive narrative of the people, places, and events associated with African American Civil Rights movement,” said NPS Director Chunk Sams. This years’ National Park Service grant awards will benefit 44 projects in 15 states and support the continued preservation of sites and history related to the African American struggle for equality.

President Taylor and the Rust College Board of Trustees will continue to engage stakeholders in the efforts of revitalize MIC and integrate it into the Rust College campus community. Preservation of MIC campus will provide space for students and community organizations and this $500,000 award is a critical step toward realizing this plan. Rust College is continuing to build momentum around preserving the MIC campus and is planning and outdoor celebration on the campus later this summer. This event will be open to community stakeholder, investors and historians to celebrate the momentum happening with restoring one of our historic HBCUs.

“This project is support through an African American Civil Rights grant, provided by the Historic Preservation Fund, as administrated by the National Park Service, Department of Interior.”

About Rust College
Rust College is the oldest most prestigious historically black college in Mississippi founded in 1866 by the Freedmen’s Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Offering degree programs in business, education, humanities, science and mathematics, and social science, Rust College equips and inspires students for excellence and service in their communities and throughout the world. Located in Holly Springs, MS, just 35 miles southeast of Memphis, Tennessee, Rust College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate and baccalaureate degrees.

For more information about Rust College, call (662) 252-8000, ext. 4915 or visit www.rustcollege.edu.

About Mississippi Industrial College
Mississippi Industrial College was founded in 1905 by the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. Bishop Elias Cottrell wanted to found a college for Negro youth which would inculcate Christian ideals, provide a practical education, and make better citizens. The first classes were held that fall. For the next 77 years the school fulfilled that mission, expanding to teacher education, the ministry, and the liberal arts. The 1960 MIC Key, shows that the overwhelming number of graduates majored in elementary education; physical education and mathematics also had high graduation numbers. In addition, MIC offered programs in auto mechanics, home economics and commercial subjects. As with many historically black colleges, MIC lost students when they were allowed to attend formerly all-white schools. Changing expectations of a new generation of black students led to greater enrollment losses at MIC. After federal funding was cut in 1981, MIC was forced to close in 1982.

About the National Park Service
More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 423 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

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BLUEFIELD, W.VA – Bluefield State College has been approved for university status. The college is the last four-year public college in West Virginia to earn the title, joining its fellow HBCU, West Virginia State University in Institute. Bluefield State has completed all of the requirements to become a university.

The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission’s board, which oversees the four-year school, voted unanimously to approve the BSC’s request on Thursday. The next step is for the BSC Board of Governors to meet to approve the change, which will take place sometime next week.

Robin Capehart, Bluefield State College President

In December, the commission allowed Bluefield State to start offering master’s in business administration or MBA degrees, BSC’s first graduate degree program in the college’s history.

Colleges must meet several criteria to reach university status, and that includes offering at least one master’s-level degree program; having an approved mission statement that provides for the offering of graduate programs; obtaining the approval of the Higher Learning Commission to offer any master’s degree program; and, having at least two-thirds of its faculty holding a terminal degree.

According to the Bluefield Daily Telegraph, becoming a university was one of the goals of Capehart when he took over the reins in January 2019, as well as bringing back on-campus housing, with both goals accomplished and more housing coming.

Capehart said the university status means an “opportunity to step up our game” and become more of a regional school and a competitive school.

About Bluefield State College
Bluefield State College, a historically black institution, is to prepare students for diverse professions, informed citizenship, community involvement, and public service in an ever-changing global society by providing an affordable, accessible opportunity for public higher education through certificate, associate, bachelor, and master degree programs. For more information, visit www.bluefieldstate.edu.

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Dr. Helene Gayle, MD, Globally Recognized Public Health Leader

ATLANTA, GA – Last month, the Spelman College Board of Trustees unanimously voted to appoint Helene Gayle, MD as its 11th president. Spelman College has a long, proud history of excellence and global leadership in the education of women of African descent and is committed to addressing racial inequities in education ensuring equitable opportunities for students of all economic backgrounds. Dr. Gayle’s presidency will begin on July 1, 2022.

Dr. Gayle currently serves as president and CEO of the Chicago Community Trust, one of the nation’s oldest and largest community foundations. Under her leadership, the Trust grew it assets from roughly $2.8B to $4.7B and adopted a strategic plan aimed at closing the racial and ethnic wealth gap. A public health leader and humanitarian, Dr. Gayle spent nearly a decade as president and CEO of Atlanta-based CARE, one of the largest international humanitarian organizations, with approximately 11,000 staff and poverty fighting programs that reached 82 million people in 2010 in 87 countries. Under Dr. Gayle’s leadership, CARA reinforced its commitment to empowering girls and women to bring lasting change to communities living in poverty.

“Our success for more than a century and a half has been built by an engaged student body and alumnae, committed faculty and staff, and a history of exemplary presidents,” said Rosalind G. Brewer, Board Chair of Spelman College. “I’m excited about Dr. Gayle’s appointment and confident that her demonstrated ability to address complex issues in communities of color many of which involve the strength of Black females and her success factors, coupled with her commitment to equity, will further build on Spelman’s legacy and propel the College into the future.”

In months-long search, the Presidential Search Committee sought a leader who embodies the Spelman mission of academic excellence and global leadership, and whose experience and expertise would build on the College’s momentum in key areas, including affordability, entrepreneurship and innovation, and the Arts. In considering the Search Committee’s recommendation, the Board of Trustees considered key priorities for Spelman’s 11th president, some of which included increasing or improving the student experience, such as safety and housing, building on Spelman’s fiscal strength and maintaining the college’s attraction to diverse and talented students, faculty and staff.

“I am honored and look forward to being a part of a long, proud legacy committed to the education of women of African descent. This is a moment where HBCU are once again being recognized for the importance that they bring to every sector of this country,” said Dr. Gayle. “Spelman has a strong history of changing lives for people who will change lives. The idea of giving back to generations of students through cutting-edge academic programs and facilities, increasing college affordability, raising financial aid support and increasing the endowment, and developing new career pathways and opportunities is what invigorates and excites me about the new role.”

As Spelman’s 11th president, Dr. Gayle will assume the presidency at a time when the college is thriving. Spelman was named U.S. News and World Report’s #1 Historically Black College or University for 15 years in a row in 2022, the Nation Science Foundation’s #1 baccalaureate institution of Black or African American science and engineering doctorate recipients and is a top producer of Fulbright Scholars.

I am so proud to learn of the appointment of Dr. Helene Gayle as the 11th president of Spelman College. The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) welcomes you to leadership with open arms, and we are confident with the wealth of experience you have that you will lead Spelman with great courage,” said Demetrius Johnson Jr., HCF’s Founder, President & CEO.

Dr. Gayle holds a Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, in Psychology from Barnard College-Columbia University, a M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and a M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. She serves on several public and nonprofit boards, including The Coco-Cola Company; Organon & Co, a women’s health care company; Palo Alto Network, a cybersecurity company; and the Brookings Institution. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Science.

About Spelman College
Founded in 1881, Spelman College is a leading liberal arts college widely recognized as the global leader in the education of women of African descent. Located in Atlanta, GA, the College’s picturesque campus is home to 2,100 students. Spelman is the country’s leading producer of Black women who complete Ph.D.s in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The College’s status is confirmed by U.S. News & World Report, which ranked Spelman No. 54 among all liberal arts colleges, No. 24 for undergraduate teaching, No. 4 for social mobility among liberal arts colleges, and No. 1 for the 15th year among historically Black colleges and universities. The Wall Street Journal ranked the College No. 3, nationally, in terms of student satisfaction. Recent initiatives include a designation by the Department of Defense as a Center of Excellence for Minority Women in STEM, a Gender and Sexuality Studies Institute, the first endowed queer studies chair at an HBCU, and a program to increase the number of Black women Ph.D.s in economics. New majors have been added, including documentary filmmaking and photography, and collaborations have been established with, Johns Hopkins through the Vivian Thomas Scholars, IBM HBCU Center for Quantum Computing, the Broad Institute and the Army Research Lab for artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Outstanding alumnae include Children’s Defense Fund founder Marian Wright Edelman, Walgreens Boots Alliance CEO Rosalind Brewer, political leader Stacey Abrams, former Acting Surgeon General and Spelman’s first alumna president Audrey Forbes Manley, actress and producer Latanya Richardson Jackson, global bioinformatics geneticist Janina Jeff and authors Pearl Cleage and Tayari Jones. To learn more, please visit spelman.edu and @spelmancollege on social media.

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Budget outlines important investment in students and public institutions

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker and members of the General Assembly visited the campus of Chicago State University on April 19, 2022 for the signing of a $46 billion FY 2023 budget.

CHICAGO, IL – Last month, the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) commended Illinois lawmakers on the passage of the 2023 fiscal budget, which focuses on relief, education, and public safety. The budget also included an increase in funding for K-12 public schools, MAP and supports higher education institutions.

“This is an exciting time for the state of Illinois and the future of education for many Illinoisans. HCF commends the work of House Speaker Emanuel Chris Welch, House Democrats, and Illinois Governor JB Pritzker for their continuous support of making the welfare of Illinois residents a priority. The passage of the 2023 fiscal budget makes a massive impact on K-12 public schools and influences higher education within the state,said Demetrius Johnson Jr., HCF’s Founder, President & CEO. “The budget includes more funding for K-12 public schools and allocates towards MAP, which will allow additional students with financial needs funds for tuition and fees to pursue an undergraduate degree. And as always, I truly appreciate their support of Illinois’ only four-year, Predominantly Black Institution, Chicago State University. The 2023 budget will give Illinois higher education institutions a 5% increase in funding, including CSU. Additionally, it adds $1.8 million to CSU’s appropriation for the current fiscal year of 2022. Governor Pritzker and House Speaker Welch’s support outs an exceptional value on higher education within the state and the economy. Thank you for your investment into a brighter future.”

The budget provides a significant investment in Illinois’ higher education institutions and students. Illinois four-year universities, which includes Chicago State University (CSU), Illinois’ only designated Predominantly Black Institution, would receive a 5% increase in funding for fiscal year 2023 relative to this year’s current budget. The passed budget also adds an additional $1.8 million to CSU’s appropriation for the current fiscal year of 2022.

Additionally, adding more funding to K-12 publics schools, the budget also strengthen financial aid for students throughout the state. The increase funding of $122 million for the Illinois Monetary Award Program (MAP) grant is allow more low-income students to receive funds to assist with college tuition and fees.

“Governor Pritzker’s budget recognizes the unparalleled value of higher education to the Illinois’ economy,” said Zaldwaynaka “Z” Scott, Esq., President of Chicago State University. “Our data shows that each year CSU adds $1.6 billion to the Illinois economy and a strong return-on-investment for our students. As the University remains laser focused on equitable education and workforce development, this investment will allow CSU to further strengthen its economic impact as well as our student success.

Last year, CSU released its inaugural Economic Impact Study, conducted by economists, demonstrating that the institution is a driving force in the Illinois economy by adding $1.6 billion in income to the Illinois economy, support 17,525 jobs, and providing a strong return on investment for students and Illinois taxpayers.

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Drake State Community and Technical College is offering a free professional development training course for middle school and high school science teachers. For one week, teachers will earn a $500 stipend for participating in a fun-filled, educationally packed immersion into NASA inspired curriculum. Plus, the training meets professional development CEU requirements. The program will equip teachers with tools that will enable them to design and implement lesson plans that are connected to NASA’s goals and mission.

When: June 13-17
Where: Drake State, 3421 Meridan St.
Time: 8:30 am – 2 pm

“This is a wonderful opportunity for teachers to learn about industry best practices and trends in the science and engineering world,” said Dr. Marina Kinsbury, Director of Sponsored Programs. “The program will expand their knowledge in STEM education and help prepare students for careers in engineering.”

Those interested in participating can sign up online at https://form.jotform.com/221216920976155.

About Drake State Community & Technical College
Drake State Community & Technical College offers flexible, affordable university-transfer and technical degrees, certificates, adult and continuing education, and customized skills training to fulfill the diverse workforce needs of employers. Visit www.drakestate.edu for more information.

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April is celebrated as Community College Month. The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF), a nonprofit advocacy and educational organization, recognizes the community colleges designated as a Historically Black College and University (HBCU).

Community College Month is an opportunity to demonstrate the vital importance of how community colleges impact the surrounding communities and make an undeniable case for why these colleges deserve greater public support. Many people don’t know that some of these institutions do exist and that they serve a greater purpose in the HBCU community for traditional and non-traditional students. The majority of the community colleges are partnered with surrounding four-year institutions to make associate degrees, and course credits transferable to those four-year colleges or universities to complete bachelor’s degrees.

Furthermore, community colleges partner with area businesses to create academic and workforce training programs; for instance, Drake State is an excellent example as it is the first and only institution of its kind in Alabama. It offers its students comprehensive academic and technical training programs and certificates. Drake State also provides flexible, affordable university-transfer degrees and customized skills training to fulfill the diverse workforce need of employers.

Shorter College campus in Little Rock, Arkansas. Photo is courtesy of HCF media team.

As a result, in total there are eleven community colleges that exist and have HBCU designation with Alabama having the most of six institutions. With hopes to provide financial support from the HBCU Campaign Fund in the near future, three of the current serving presidents of the two-year institutions have been recognized as a Most Dominant HBCU Leader by the organization for their outstanding work in moving the institutions forward.

Bishop State Community College
• Coahoma Community College
• Denmark Technical College
• Drake State Community and Technical College
• Gadsden State Community College
• Hinds Community College at Utica
• Shelton State Community College
• Shorter College
• Southern University at Shreveport
• St. Philip’s College
• Trenholm State Community College

Drake State Community and Technical College changed its name in 1966 to J.F. Drake State in honor of the late Joseph Fanning Drake, a long-time president of Alabama A&M University. The institution has established university articulation agreements with Alabama A&M University, Oakwood University, Athens State University, and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. With these agreements, it expands options for its students and makes it possible for graduates with technical associate degrees in computer information systems, electrical engineering technology, and business programs to transfer seamlessly to those universities. Under the leadership of Dr. Patricia Sims, Drake State is also the first and only historically Black community college to be awarded a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) by NASA’s Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP). Graduates of Drake State are known to have started their own businesses, and the institution has had a strong influence on economic development in the region. Dr. Patricia Sims was named among the Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2020 by the HBCU Campaign Fund.

Denmark Technical College President Dr. Willie L. Todd, Jr. seen awarding a student during the college’s Honors Convocation. Photo courtesy of Denmark Technical College.

On the other hand, Denmark Technical College is also making pathways for its students. The college is located in Denmark, South Carolina, just an inch before you get to the camping grounds of Voorhees University. And just like Drake State, Denmark Technical is the only technical college in South Carolina with on-campus housing. It is a two-year, historically Black technical college that provides students within the area with affordable opportunities for associate degrees, diplomas, or certificates. It is an HBCU that is on the rise, though previously, it had its reputation for being in financial trouble and a threat towards closure. According to Diverse Issues of Higher Education, under Dr. Willie L. Todd, Jr’s leadership, Denmark has overcome its obstacles; its nursing program increased by 150% and its workforce program revenue by 1101%. Job placement rates after graduation are currently at 87%. Dr. Todd has served as the ninth president at the institution since 2020.

The state of Alabama consists of six of the eleven HBCU community colleges; all of them fall under the umbrella of the Alabama Community College System, including Drake State. The others are Bishop State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, Lawson State Community College, Shelton State Community College, and Trenholm State Community College. Additionally, Southern University at Shreveport is also part of a system, the Southern University System, the only historically Black university system in America. However, Shorter College in Little Rock, Arkansas, may not be part of a system. Still, it is the only private historically Black college and university (HBCU) junior college in the nation.

Another unique and thriving HBCU community college is St. Philip’s College in San Antonio, Texas. It is America’s only college that is federally designated as both Historically Black College (HBC) and a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). It too is part of the Alamo College District system. It was founded by the Episcopal Church in 1898 to educate and train slaves. Today, SPC serves approximately 12,696 students and offer over 70 academic and technical options. A product of Alcorn State University, SPC current president Dr. Adena Williams Loston was selected as one of The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2021 by the HBCU Campaign Fund.

St. Philip’s College President Dr. Adena Williams Loston is seen speaking with faculty, staff and students. Photo courtesy of St. Philip’s College.

Traditionally, community colleges are known to be the most affordable, given that Coahoma Community College has repeatedly been named the most affordable HBCU in the nation by StudentLoanHero.com. Matriculating at a community college can always be a starting point to beginning your collegiate journey. It can also be a point in your life where you may not be quite ready to attend a four-year college or university. Many community colleges offer flexibility and the resources you need to make it possible to stay enrolled and complete your chosen program. These institutions are also dedicated to dual enrollment students or even may have high schools incorporated on the campuses. Do your research, and contact the college’s admission office for more information.

Just as crucial as any higher education institution, our community colleges are that important to the space. If HCF can be of any assistance in your college journey, please feel free to reach out to our representatives, who are always open to assisting. We welcome you to contact our office via email at support@hbcucampaignfund.org.

Join us in April of every year as we honor and celebrate the important work of community colleges. Embrace those who are designated as an HBCU, support its mission. Happy Community College Month!

Photo: Grambling State University’s World Famed Marching Band performing halftime during the Black College Football Hall of Fame Football Classic, September 2021 in Canton, Ohio. Credit: HCF Media Team.

CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF), a non-profit advocacy and educational organizations, announces the return of its Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour for its sixth year in 2022. Organization representatives will hit the road this fall once again in support of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) football classics. The tour will be joined by the Division of College Relations and Scholarships on specific dates to assist with recruiting students to HBCUs. The Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour is the organization’s most significant initiative program.

L to R: Keisha J. Kelley, CEO of BlackCollegeExperience and Demetrius Johnson Jr., Founder, President & CEO at HBCU Campaign Fund pictured at 80th Magic City Classic in Birmingham, AL.

In 2021, the tour made stops at the BCFHOF Football Classic in Canton, OH; Circle City Classic and College Fair in Indianapolis, IN; Alabama State University’s homecoming game; Magic City Classic in Birmingham, AL; Bayou Classic in New Orleans, LA; and the SWAC Football Championship game. The organization looks to return to its previously annual appearances at the Southern Heritage Classic and College and Career Fair, and the Chicago Football Classic. It also looks to add to the roster the John Merritt Classic, Fountain City Classic, St. Louis HBCU Classic, and Turkey Day Classic. The Division of College Relations and Scholarships joins the tour for the CFC, SHC, and CCC college fairs to provide to students with imperative information about attending college and the HBCU experience/campus life.

“This will be year two since the pandemic had to put us on shutdown, and football year were canceled in 2020. As always, Our media team is so excited to return to the field sidelines to cover and highlight HBCU football as well as our college fair representatives, but what’s more enjoying is meeting people of our HBCU family,” said Demetrius Johnson Jr., Founder, President & CEO at HBCU Campaign Fund. “It is such a reminiscing moment to look forward to planning season and put our outreach efforts in motion to tell the story of our nation’s HBCUs and MSIs. I believe this initiative is our happy space, and we look forward to it every year.”

The Division of College Relations and Scholarships was established to partner with and recruit prospective students to HBCUs and MSIs. Representatives are assigned to mentor and encourage students to choose the right institution that best fits their educational needs. The division has also established its signature “College Bound Guide Folders,” which provides students with college tips, scholarship information, FAFSA information, HBCU marketing materials – brochures and flyers, and career planning information.

“We always look to getting back out and meeting with students and their parents in encouraging them to choose HBCU; that is our goal at HCF. We also hope to encourage others to enroll at an HBCU or even support one. We also hope to continue to inspire and meet members of the HBCU community and supporters who follow the work of our organization,” Demetrius continued. “We hope this tour brings empowerment and awareness to HBCUs while making sure the names of HBCU institutions are known to the unknown.”

The 2022 confirmed dates are as follows.

  • Sunday, September 4th: Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic; Canton, Ohio
  • Friday, September 9th: SHC College and Career Fair; Saturday, September 10th: SHC football game; Memphis, TN
  • Saturday, October 1st: John Merritt Classic; Nashville, TN *
  • Sunday, October 16th: St. Louis HBCU Classic; St. Louis, MO
  • Saturday, October 29th: Magic City Classic; Birmingham, AL
  • Saturday, November 5th: Fountain City Classic; Columbus, GA *
  • Thursday, November 24th: Turkey Day Classic; Birmingham, AL *
  • Saturday, November 26th: Bayou Classic; New Orleans, LA
  • Circle City Classic, TBA
  • Chicago Football Classic, TBA
  • = pending confirmation. All dates are subject to cancellation and may not be rescheduled.

Those who would like to donate to support HCF’s continued advocacy work and the Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour can give online by clicking here or text CAMPAIGNFORHBCUS to 1-844-701-5181.

Photo: 2021 Circle City Classic battle of the bands halftime show, Indianapolis, Indiana. Credit: HCF Media Team.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF)
The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded in 2012 and is a nonprofit educational organization that remains a strong advocate for students and higher education. The mission of HCF is to support the significance and raise funds for scholarships, programming, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

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A website is essential to our work and the organization needs at the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF). It allows the public to learn more about our work, access resources, and read exciting news happening within the HBCU space. Nevertheless, we are calling on our supporters to help us raise funds to restore and keep our website functioning.

HCF’s funding goal is to reach $50,000 for the year to continue the work we do in supporting and advocating for students and higher education. You can give the gift of support and help make an impact to the committed work that we do.

CLICK HERE TO MAKE A DONATION

Thank you for your unwavering support of HCF!

Demetrius Johnson Jr.
Founder, President & CEO

Dr. Dennis Shields

BATON ROUGE, LA – The Southern University System Board of Supervisors named Dr. Dennis Shields has the next president of the Southern University System and chancellor of Southern University and A&M College during it’s meeting on February 18. Shields, the current chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Platteville, will succeed President-Chancellor Ray L. Belton, who announced his retirement in 2021. Belton’s contract ends on June 30.

“I think the selection of Dennis Shields represents our belief that he’s the best fit to lead the University following Dr. Belton,” said Edwin Shorty, chairman of the Southern University System Board. “We felt that Mr. Shields comes with the right mix of qualities to further advance the University.”

Shields, who has been the chancellor for the University of Wisconsin Platteville since 2010, has spent most of his career advocating for better access to higher education – especially those who have been historically underrepresented. Under Shields’ leadership, the campus has had tremendous growth. Enrollment grew nearly 11 percent from 2010 to fall 2016. Most recently, he led successful efforts to gain legislative and gubernatorial approval to build a new $55 million state-of-the-art engineering facility on campus as well as a $23.7 million renovation project for one of the liberal arts buildings on campus. Those two projects, plus a $15.3 million Williams Fieldhouse expansion, will give the university more than $93 million in upcoming growth and improvements. Additionally, he led the construction of two residence halls, one with a dinning facility.

“I am humbled and honored by your confidence in me to take on this role at this wonderful institution of higher education,” said Shields to the Southern University Board via live stream video during the meeting. “I had a remarkable and inspiring visit (to campus) and was able to spend some time with the students. I take it as a great responsibility to help continue to rise of the Southern University System.”

Prior to his current position in Wisconsin, Shields held administrative positions in admissions at the University of Iowa College of Law, University of Michigan Law School and Duke University School of Law. He has also held a deanship and a teaching position at Phoenix School of Law and act as the vice president for student affairs at The City College of New York.

A champion of diversity and access, Shields served as the first chair of the Diversity and Inclusion Working Group of the National Collegiate Athletics Association for Division lll. With Shields at the helm, the University of Wisconsin Platteville, has focused more on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education. Initiatives have successfully doubled the number of students from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds over the course of the past decade.

Shields, an Iowa native, earned a bachelors degree in business administration from Graceland College in 1977, and a juris doctoral from the University of Iowa College of Law in 1982.

Shields will officially begin his term once a final contract is approved by the Southern University Board.

About Southern University and A&M College
Southern University and A&M College, an Historically Black, 1890 land-grant institution, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is to provide a student-focused teaching and learning environment that creates global leadership opportunities for a diverse student population where teaching, research, service, scholarly and creative expectations for students and faculty are achieved through the bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs offered at the institution via different instructional modalities and via public service. For more information, visit www.subr.edu.

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Budget Outlines Important Investment in Students and Public Institutions

The proposed budget will support college affordability and focus on closing equity gaps in Illinois education.

CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) applaud Illinois Governor JB Pritzker’s fiscal year 2023 budget proposal that outlines significant investment in Illinois’ higher education institutions and students. Illinois four-year universities, which includes Chicago State University (CSU), Illinois’ only designated Predominantly Black Institution, would receive a 5% increase in funding for fiscal year 2023 relative to this year’s current budget. The proposal would also add an additional $1.8 million to CSU’s appropriation for the current fiscal year 2022. If approved by the General Assembly, the budget would provide critically needed resources for the University and CSU students.

Governor Pritzker’s budget also strengthens financial aid for students by, among other things, increasing funding for the Illinois Monetary Award Program (MAP) grants for low-income students by $122 million.

Governor Pritzker’s pushed the proposal for the fiscal 2022-23 budget investment early last year to provide stability for higher education institutions in Illinois, including CSU.

“Governor Pritzker’s budget recognizes the unparalleled value of higher education to the Illinois’ economy,” said Zaldwaynaka Scott, Esq., President of Chicago State University. “Our data shows that each year CSU adds $1.6 billion to the Illinois economy and a strong return-on-investment for our students. As the University remains laser focused on equitable education and workforce development, this investment will allow CSU to further strengthen its economic impact as well as our student success.”

“I would like to express sincere gratitude to Governor Pritzker for his continuous attentiveness of how much a crucial impact and value that higher education has on the state of Illinois and its economy,” said Demetrius Johnson, Jr., Founder, President & CEO of HBCU Campaign Fund. “Chicago State University is a necessary jewel to the Black community of Chicago, and we must not neglect how much economic support and return of investment CSU nourished for its students and the state of Illinois. CSU continues to focus on providing equitable education and workforce development that allows CSU to supply to underserving and low-income students. I dearly commend President Zaldwaynaka Scott on her outstanding leadership, and we thank the Governor for his continued investment in a brighter future for the students in Illinois.”

Last year, CSU released its inaugural Economic Impact Study, conducted by economists, that demonstrated the institution is driving force in the Illinois economy by adding $1.6 billion in income to the Illinois economy, supporting 17,525 jobs, and providing a strong return on investment for students and Illinois taxpayers.

HCF President Johnson stated that the organization is elated to continue to play the role as a strong advocate and supporter of Chicago State University.

Click here to view Governor Pritzker’s Budget Fiscal Year 2023.

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Zaldwaynaka Scott, Esq., President of Chicago State University.

CHICAGO, IL – ComEd recently announced the appointment of Zaldwaynaka “Z” Scott, president of Chicago State University, to its board as independent directors. Scott joins Smita Shah, CEO of SPAAN Tech, Inc., 2022 appointment, and Ricardo “Ric” Estrada, president & CEO of Metropolitan Family Services, named to the board in November 2021.

“Z and Smita are distinguished business and civic leaders from our community and have proven track records of innovation and leadership experience. We are pleased to welcome them to the ComEd board,” said Gil Quiniones, ComEd CEO. “Their respective expertise, combined with their shared passion for closing the opportunity gap for women and minorities, will serve the company well as we continue to work to create an equitable clean energy future for all communities.”

As president of Chicago State University, Scott has overseen the development and advancement of its strategic plan for 2020 to 2025 to ensure the institution leads with the mission of transforming students’ lives through innovation and excellence in ethical leadership.

Scott is also a well-known advocate for equity in higher education. She formed and co-chairs the Equity Working Group, a body of leaders from across the education, public, private, philanthropic, and community development sectors to address Black students access and success in Illinois higher education.

“I’m honored to join ComEd’s board of directors and advance its values of integrity, forward thinking, openness to ideas and principled decision-making,” said Scott. “I’m excited to support ComEd’s important work to build a cleaner and brighter future for communities across Chicagoland and northern Illinois.”

Scott serves on the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago board of directors where she also sits on the board’s Audit and Compliance and the Nominating and Governance Committee. In addition, she serves on the board of trustees for the John H. Shedd Aquarium and the United States Coast Guard Academy. Scott is also a member of The Chicago Network where she chairs the Government Committee.

Scott holds a J.D. from Indiana University Maurer School of Law and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana.

About ComEd
ComEd is a unit of Chicago-based Exelon Corporation (NASDAQ: EXC), a Fortune 200 energy company with approximately 10 million electricity and natural gas customers – the largest number of customers in the U.S. ComEd powers the lives of more than 4 million customers across northern Illinois, or 70 percent of the state’s population. For more information, visit ComEd.com.

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Dr. Jenkins is second longest tenured leader in Livingstone College’s history

Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr., second longest tenured president of Livingstone College.

SALIRBURY, NC – Livingstone College President Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr., announced to the Board of Trustees on Feb. 9 that he will retire from his role on July 1, 2022, after 16 years of service.

Jenkins was appointed to lead the historically black college in February 2006. He is the second longest tenured president in the history of the school.

Prior to Livingstone, Jenkins served as president of Edward Waters College in Jacksonville, Fla., where a gymnasium there bears his name. Before that, he made history by becoming the first alumnus of Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) to serve as chancellor, after earning both his master’s and doctorate degrees in biology from Purdue University. A science building at ECSU is named in his honor.

The Livingstone Board of Trustees reluctantly accepted Jenkins letter and recognized his constructive feats as president. New board chairman Bishop Kenneth Monroe said that Jenkins will remain in role as president until a successor is appointed, and trustees and the college prepare for a series of events commemorating his tenure.

“Having labored 38 years as a college and university president has been exhilarating and exhausting,” said Jenkins. “I am grateful for the great support from the Livingstone College Board of Trustees, our alumni, the people and leaders of the City of Salisbury and Rowan County, donors and friends of the college. There is a strong sense of melancholy in the realization that a long career is ending, yet to quote Kenny Rogers, you have to know when to hold them and when to fold them – and I believe that time has come. The city has been good to me and my family as evidenced by the kind of collaborative support that has been demonstrated over these past 16 years.

Rev. Dr. Nilous M. Avery, II talks with Livingstone College President Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins as they process to the Founder’s Day program at Varick Auditorium. Thursday, February 11, 2016, in Salisbury, N.C. / JON C. LAKEY / SALISBURY POST

During his tenure, Livingstone has undergone significant progress. At his hiring, Jenkins challenged the Board of Trustees to use his experiences to change the college approach to educating students often troubled by socio-economic difficulties, thus creating the Holistic College model.

Under Jenkins’ leadership, the campus saw its first major construction in more than 40 years in that of Honor Hall, apartment-style united for new students with high grade-point averages.

He is credited with saving the college from closure from its accrediting agency, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission Colleges (SACSCOC). Today, the college boasts reaffirmation of accreditation for the next 10 years without a single recommendation.

jenkins also raised the net asset value of the college by $15 million; acquired a former Holiday Inn to established the hospitality management and culinary arts program; and reactivated the college’s 40 acres of land to grow food and supply culinary arts.

College enrollment grew 35 percent to 1,400 students, the largest in school history (pre-COVID), resulting in Livingstone purchasing College Park Apartments, a four-building complex that houses 100 students.

“Livingstone College was its lowest ebb when we began our search for a new president in 2006,” said Bishop George W.C. Walker, former chairman of the Board of Trustees. “Dr. Jenkins became the best candidate in the search process and ultimately the president. He provided the greatest tenure of a president in the history of the college. Dr. Jenkins phenomenally lifted the college to extraordinary heights. Without question, Livingstone College is in a much better place because of his presidency.”

Jenkins was named one of ‘The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2021′ by the HBCU Campaign Fund, citing the past accomplishments as president of Edward Water College, vice chancellor and chancellor of Elizabeth City State University, and currently at Livingstone College.

Jenkins’ retirement announcement comes the same week Livingstone held a ribbon cutting on a new state-of-the-art science annex, and on the heels of several major developments at the college including new upgrades to Alumni Memorial Stadium, construction of an esports arena; and application for Livingstone to apply for Level lll status to award graduate degrees and be renamed Livingstone University.

Additionally, under Jenkins’ leadership, Livingstone started a Study Abroad Student Exchange Program with students studying and living in five foreign countries; became a gated campus with decorate wrought iron fencing; relocated the Blue Bear mascot to the front lawn and painted it blue, and established a campus radio station, WLJZ 107.1M.

“Emphasis is always placed on leadership – the pilot – but we cannot forget the ground crew,” Jenkins recently told faculty and staff at opening session. “The pilot is important, but the work is executed by the ground crew. Your work is critical to our success.”

The goal, he said, was to create an environment where young men and women would not only obtain a degree, but have the capacity to command their rightful place in the global society, Jenkins said.

“I still feel this is why God has had his hand on this institution,” he said. “We serve the underserved, but that does not mean they are not deserving. They may be disadvantaged, but certainly not disregard. I’m glad my life work has been at an HBCU.”

About Livingstone College
Livingstone College is a private historically black college that is secured by a strong commitment to quality instruction, academic excellence and student success. Through a Christian-based environment suitable for holistic learning, Livingstone provides excellent business, liberal arts, STEAM, teacher education and workforce development programs for students from all ethnic backgrounds designed to promote lifelong learning, and to develop student potential for leadership and service to a global community. For more information, visit www.livingstone.edu.

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PINE BLUFF, AR – The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) Office of Recruitment is preparing to host it annual Lion Fever day on Friday, April 1, 2022, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Lion Fever Day is UAPB’s biggest high school preview days, and is designed to allow high school juniors and seniors an opportunity to see various parts of UAPB campus life and experience speaking with college advisors personally in an effort to gain details about his or her desired area of major. Activities will include a college fair, campus tour, a chance to hear the university’s marching band and view performances form select Greek organizations.

Interest students or school groups that would like to participate must RSVP by clicking here. The event is free and open to the public.

For more information about Lion Fever Day, contact UAPB’s Office of Recruitment at (870) 575-8963.

About the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff is a public comprehensive HBCU 1890 Land-Grant Institution. The University embraces its land-grant mission of providing cutting edge research, teaching, outreach, and service programs that respond to the social and economic needs of the state and region. Its mission is to promote and sustain excellent academic programs that integrate quality instruction, research, and student learning experiences responsive to the needs of a racially, culturally, and economically diverse student population. Ultimately, the University is dedicated to providing access and opportunity to academically deserving students and producing graduates who are equipped to excel through their contributions and leadership in a 21st century national and global community. For more information, visit www.uapb.edu.

Drake State Community & Technical College campus, Huntsville, Alabama.

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Students at Drake State Community & Technical College will have access to new scholarship dollars over the next year thanks to an anonymous $200,000 donation.

“Receiving the email about this gift to the college was both a pleasant surprise and welcome recognition of the good work of our faculty and staff,” said Dr. Patricia G. Sims, Drake State President. “So many students will benefit from the scholarships funded by this donation.”

The anonymous benefactor chose Drake State because they admire the college’s growth and development over the past few years and the school’s rapid response to the pressures of COVID-19 and increased need for skilled workers in today’s workforce.

At Drake State, we’ve worked hard to develop the programs students need to be successful,” Sims noted. In the past few years Drake State:

  • Became the first and only Historically Black Community College to be awarded a Cooperative Agreement Notice from the NASA/MSFC Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) in support of NASA’s Moon to Mars Planetary Autonomous Construction Technologies.
  • Was awarded a $1.3 NASA/MSFC MUREP grant to develop a STEM pipeline for minorities and underrepresented populations.
  • Increased enrollment and retention rates despite the challenges colleges faced from COVID-19. Of note, Drake State saw its completion rate increase by 92.27% since 2020, including a significant increase in short-term certificate awards, showing the call for workers to upskill and return to the workforce.

The donor also expressed interest in supporting Drake State’s work with Veterans and military families and applauded the college’s ability to provide these students with an extra measure of attention.

The nature of this donation will allow the college to remove financial barriers for many students completing short-term certifications or academic degrees.

“We are humbled by the faith shown to our institution and look forward to reporting inspiring success stores about students benefiting from these new scholarships in the months ahead,” Sims added. “I invited other individuals and businesses in our community to learn more about the good work we are doing and step up to support our efforts.”

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MISSISSIPPI – In the early morning hours on Tuesday, February 1, 2022, five of Mississippi’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities received an unsubstantiated bomb threat to our campuses. Once the threat was received, we each worked with our Department of Public Safety and local emergency response personnel to thoroughly investigate and determine the extent of the threat. Subsequently law enforcement officials cleared all campuses. The fact that these threats came on the first day of Black History Month proves these actions were intentional attempts to disrupt, invoke fear and discourage our faculty, staff, scholars, and the campus communities. Despite these threats, Mississippi’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities – WE STAND UNITED!

Alcorn State University, Jackson State University, Mississippi Valley State University, Rust College, Tougaloo College, Coahoma Community College, and Hinds Community College, Utica have long served our state and nation as educational beacons and have been a critical engine of life-changing opportunities for thousands of graduates and current students. We remain committed to ensuring each institution’s continued growth and success while guarding the safety of our greatest assets – our students.

Though we are forced to navigate some of the most politically and socially polarizing times in this nation’s history, collectively, we will remain strong and resilient and not be intimidated or fearful. As Mississippi’s HBCU community, we will continue our mission to inspire and empower the next generation of change agents who will go on to boldly confront hatred and injustice as it exists in all its forms.

The threats we received, along with several other HBCUs across the country, Illustrate the need for us to support one other. We are stronger together. As HBCUs, our histories speak of trials and triumphs, contest and courage, limitations and longevity. We are here on purpose, and we must be diligent in preserving and promoting our past, present, and future to further prove our importance and relevance to this nation’s economy and landscape.

Together we will forge ahead with a common purpose to advance academic excellence, promote good moral character, maintain professional integrity, and stand on the truth, and our institutions will continue to persevere as many of us have done for more than 100 years. We ask that the alumni and friend/supporters of our institutions join us as we stand against hatred, bigotry, and intolerance. This is our voice. This is our fight. These are our HBCUs.

Felecia M. Nave, Ph.D., President – Alcorn State University

Thomas K. Hudson, J.D., President – Jackson State University

Jerryl Briggs, Ed.D., President – Mississippi Valley State University

Ivy R. Taylor, Ed.D., President – Rust College

Carmen J. Walters, Ph.D., President – Tougaloo College

Valmadge T. Towner, Ph.D., President – Coahoma Community College

Stephen Vacik, Ed.D., President – Hinds Community College, Utica

ORANGEBURG, SC Fifty-four years ago, on this day in 1968, the Orangeburg Massacre events happened in Orangeburg, South Carolina, on the campus of South Carolina State University.

Pictured: Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond Jr., and Delano Middleton, the three men who were killed in the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre that happened on the campus of South Carolina State University.

In the fall of 1967, some of the black leaders within the community tried to convince Harry K. Floyd, the owner of a bowling alley to allow African-Americans. Floyd was unwilling to desegregate which resulted in protests in early February 1968.

On February 6, 1968, a group of students (approximately 200) from South Carolina State University entered into the bowling alley and left peacefully after they were asked to leave by Floyd. The next night more students led by John Stroman returned and entered the bowling alley. This time, there were police waiting for them and several students were arrested including Stroman. After the arrests, more students began showing up angry, breaking a window of the bowling alley and chaos occurred. Police began beating student protesters with billy clubs. That night, eight students were sent to the hospital.

On the night of February 8, 1968, students started a bonfire in the front of South Carolina State University’s campus. As law enforcement attempted to put out the fire, Officer David Shealy was injured by a thrown object. Shortly after (around 10:30 p.m.) South Carolina Highway Patrol officers began firing into the crowd of around 150 protesters. Eight Patrol Officers fired carbines, short guns, and revolvers at the protesters, which lasted around 10 to 15 seconds in an attempt to calm the crowd. South Carolina State students Samuel E. Hammond Jr., Henry E. Smith and high school student Delano Middleton (who attended the local Wilkinson High School) were killed, along with twenty-eight people who were injured in the shooting.

In the aftermath of this event, the federal government brought charged against the State patrolmen in the first federal trial of police officers for using excessive force at a campus protest. All nine defendants were acquitted although thirty-six witnesses stated that they did not hear gunfire coming from the protesters on campus before the shooting and no students were found to be carrying guns.

In a state trail in 1970, the activist Cleveland Sellers was convicted of a charged of riot related to the events on February 6 at the bowling alley. He was the national program director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

South Carolina State University’s gymnasium is named in the memorandum of Samuel Hammond, Delano Middleton, and Henry Smith (S-H-M Memorial Center), the three men who were killed. A monument was erected on campus in their honor, and the site has been marked.

Each year since 1968, the University has held an observance to commemorate the lives of 18-year-old SC State students Henry Smith and Samuel Hammond Jr., 17-year-old high school student Delano Middleton. This often neglected and overlooked tragedy is not nearly as well known as the shootings at Kent State and Jackson State in 1970, although it had a profound effect on the Orangeburg community and surrounding area.


“Today, we pause to remember three young men, Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond, Jr., and Delano Middleton, who were killed on South Carolina State University campus by SC Highway Patrol on this day in 1968, 54 years ago. Henry, Samuel, and Delano gave a fight to desegregate the South.

The event occurred to convince a local bowling alley in Orangeburg to allow African Americans, and the outcome was rejected. Later, claiming the lives of three young men ended as what we know it as the Orangeburg Massacre.

We pay homage to these three teenagers, along with the twenty-eight people who were injured, recommitting us that we must continue to fight for social justice and get in good, necessary trouble. Their legacy lives on as we shall not live in silence about ending discrimination in all forms across this nation.

— Demetrius Johnson Jr.
Founder, President & CEO

F. George Shipman Science Center at Livingstone College.

SALISBURY, NC – Livingstone College is set to cut the ribbon of its state-of-the-art F. George Shipman Science Annex, named after its sixth president.

The event is schedule to take place on Friday, Feb. 11 at 11 a.m. in front of the new science center on campus, followed by a reception and tour inside the building.

The grand opening and ribbon cutting of the new science annex punctuates the college’s growing STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) program and focus on encouraging more African American students to major in STEM areas of study.

The new 16,000-square-foot science annex will featured dedicated laboratory/research spaces for microbiology, human anatomy/physiology, biochemistry and general chemistry, with smaller laboratory spaces for specialized research and a tissue culture lab.

One of the significant highlights of the facility is its planetarium/immersion theater with SciDome IQ 2400 technology, where students have a virtual-reality experience in human anatomy, physics, astronomy and earth science.

In addition to the planetarium, the annex includes a SCALE-UP classroom that facilitates active and collaborative learning, and a hydroponic greenhouse.

The new annex will allow Livingstone College to proper environment to implement a $2.24 million STEM grant it received in the fall from the National Science Foundation. The grant was the largest, single grant received in the history of the college and will fund a program called “Livingwell@Livingstone” to enhance persistence, retention and graduation rates in underrepresented minority students.

“We are thrilled to finally be act to cut the ribbon and showcase our new state-of-the-art science annex to the public,” said Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr., Livingstone College President. “This annex coupled with the STEM grant will allow us to leverage partnerships with community science entrepreneurs and enhance the STEM student experience.”

“A key driver of STEM student success is STEM identity,” said McNair. “The F. George Shipman Annex provides a dedicated space designed to enhance scientific research and conceptual understanding. Our students will see the endless possibilities that exist in STEM, and how they might contribute to future science enterprise.”

The in-person grand opening ribbon-cutting is open to the public, and those attending must follow the college’s COVID-19 protocols, which includes showing proof of vaccination or presenting a negative COVID-19 PCR test within 72 hours of the event. Masks must be worn indoors for the duration of the program, but may be removed briefly for eating and drinking.

About Livingstone College
Livingstone College is a private historically black institution that is secured by a strong commitment to quality instruction. Though a Christian-based environment suitable for learning, it provides excellent liberal arts and religious education programs for students from all ethnic backgrounds designed to develop their potential for leadership and service to a global community. For more information, visit www.livingstone.edu.

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A statue honoring the late civil rights icon Congressman John Lewis is part of a traveling exhibit passing en route to Washington, D.C. The statue was unveiled at the American College of the Building Arts on Thursday, Feb. 3.

ORANGEBURG, SC – A statue of the late civil rights icon and U.S. Congressman John Lewis will be on display at South Carolina State University for one week as part of a traveling exhibition en route to Washington, D.C. It will have a permanent home in National Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol.

The statue will be unveiled Friday, Feb. 4 in a 2 p.m. ceremony adjacent to the Orangeburg Massacre Monument on Geathers Street. The statue will remain in place until Friday, Feb. 11.

State Rep. Jerry Gowan Jr., D-Orangeburg, and SC State Interim President Alexander Conyers will be among those making remarks.

After the unveiling, the public is invited to view the statue during regular campus business hours, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Lewis passed away at the age of 80 in July 2020 aimd his 17th term in the U.S. House of Representatives.

As a leader in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, he challenged Jim Crow segregation and oppression across the South through nonviolent protest.

Lewis often put his own physical safety on the line and his bold, peaceful stands against discrimination were often met with violence. In 1965, Alabama state troopers in the town of Selma attacked Lewis and other demonstrators with clubs and tear gas during a march for voting rights.

In 1986, Lewis was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from an Atlanta district.

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Source: https://thetandd.com/news/local/lewis-statue-coming-to-s-c-state/article_8cbb55ca-bf9b-56aa-9f59-b94bc162ba06.html

Newly established PNC North Carolina HBCU Initiative to help cultivate entrepreneurship resources and opportunities for students at five universities through grant funding

RALEIGH, N.C. – The PNC Foundation is awarding more than $2 million to five Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in North Carolina to establish the PNC North Carolina HBCU Initiative, an effort that aims to enrich the future of entrepreneurship and create workforce opportunities in the state.

The grants will be distributed over a three-year period to help fund the development and delivery of entrepreneurship resources and programming for students at Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, Johnson C. Smith University, North Carolina Central University and Winston-Salem State University – institutions that play an integral role in cultivating Black business leaders and fostering wealth creation in Black communities.

“At PNC, we recognize how important HBCUs are to our state’s success,” said Weston Andress, PNC regional president for Western Carolinas. “HBCU graduates contribute significantly to be talent pipeline that is fueling North Carolina’s economy, and these institutions are foundational to shaping the workforce North Carolina needs to remain competitive in business.”

With an emphasis on entrepreneurship and economic empowerment, the PNC North Carolina HBCU Initiative will enable grantee institutions to enhance their respective entrepreneurship curricula and offerings – from the introduction of new programs, to capacity-building opportunities, to technology enhancements. Additionally, students from all five schools will have the opportunity to participate in the PNC Pitch Competition, an annual forum where student-entrepreneurs can showcase innovative ideas and demonstrate their marketing skills.

“PNC shares with these institutions a vision for advancing inclusive entrepreneurship education and opportunities,” said Jim Hansen, PNC regional president for Eastern Carolinas. “This initiative is the latest example of our ongoing support for North Carolina HBCUs, which over the years has included grant funding, mentorship programs and financial literacy education. We look forward to joining student-entrepreneurs and their campus communities on this meaningful , three year journey.”

The grant recipients will use the funding as follows:

  • Elizabeth City State University: The university will broaden the scope of its current business program portfolio to expand the Entrepreneur Lab, which offers resources and development opportunities for students interested in launching and marketing a business. Additionally, the funding will establish the PNC Entrepreneurship Fellow Program and support Viking Shark Entrepreneurship Week, which provides the opportunity for teams for North Carolina HBCUs to practice pitching their business ideas in front of judges.
  • Fayetteville State University: Funding will support the buildout of the Fayetteville State University Entrepreneurship Lab (E-Lab), an action learning opportunity designed to help students accelerate new ideas and product development. Student entrepreneur teams creating or growing their own ventures may compete for E-Lab funding to help fuel their projects. Additionally, the E-Lab will offer business and economic development support for community members and fosters self-employment opportunities.
  • Johnson C. Smith University: The university will launch the PNC Entrepreneurship Hub, which will provide selected student-entrepreneurs- PNC Fellows – with space that is conducive to developing and launching new businesses. In addition to incubator space, the hub will equip PNC Fellows with access to technology, seed funding and mentorship to help them launch new businesses to take existing businesses to the next level.
  • North Carolina Central University: Grant funding will help establish the North Carolina Central University Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (CEED), a university-based program that will provide CEED Student Fellows with entrepreneurial and community economic development education and comprehensive small business finance training, with the encouragement to become community development investors.
  • Winston-Salem State University: The grant will fund the development of the PNC Entrepreneurial Fellows Program, which will help selected students fellows learn critical aspects of new venture creation by participating in nationally certified programs, workshops, research and one-on-one mentoring with successful North Carolina entrepreneurs.

“While entrepreneurship is the central focus of the PNC North Carolina HBCU Initiative, each grantee is approaching the scope of their projects differently to meet the needs and opportunities unique to each institution,” said Lori Jones Gibbs, PNC Community Development Banking market manager for the Carolinas. “This initiative underscores the many creative ways entrepreneurship is coming to life for North Carolina students.”

These grants align with PNC’s support for HBCUs throughout the country and complement the ongoing development of the Howard University and PNC National Center for Entrepreneurship. Additionally, this funding is part of PNC’s nationwide $88 billion Community Benefits Plan, which is inclusive of a previously announced commitment of more than $1 billion to support the economic empowerment of Black and low- and moderate-income communities.

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CHICAGO, IL – In January, several HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities) have had to lock down or postpone classes due to bomb threats. Now, on the first day of Black History Month, more than a dozen HBCUs reported bomb threats for the third time. Howard University has received a bomb threat for the third time.

HCF Founder, President & CEO Demetrius Johnson Jr., issued the following statement on the third round of bomb threats targeting and threatening HBCU campuses. More than a dozen HBCUs get bomb threats on the first day of Black History Month

“Several HBCUs have received bomb threats that have put those campuses in harm, and a horrifying situation to react accordingly. As an advocacy organization for HBCUs, we are disheartened and disturbed by the continuous notice of bomb threats at HBCU campuses. The strength of our HBCU institutions truly matter; they are sacred places to our nation that we must preserve. We hope that these crimes will bring justice to those responsible and that this is a top priority for federal law enforcement. Please don’t be silent about this. If you have any information that could assist federal law enforcement in solving this, please call ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives) at (888) 283-8477 or the FBI at (800) 225-5324. HBCU Nation, please continue remain strong, safe, and aware of all of your surroundings during this unforeseen times.”

“I am calling for all HBCU advocates of NAACP, UNCF, TMCF, HBCU Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus to come together in urging an end to such crime and challenge the FBI for further investigation.”

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO – Following an extensive, nationwide search process, the Lincoln University of Missouri Board of Curators has selected Dr. John B. Moseley as the University’s 21st President.

Dr. Moseley has been leading Lincoln University as interim president since May 2021.

He has nearly 20 years of higher education experience, including 13 years at Historically Black College or University (HBCU) campuses. During his interim tenure, he has led key initiatives to improve Lincoln University’s enrollment through new, data-driven admissions strategies and the restructuring of scholarship programs. He has also implemented initiatives to improve student outcomes, such as Lincoln’s new Student Success Center. He has influenced approximately $6.6 million in private donation commitments to the university. He is also leading fundraising for the Lincoln University Health Sciences and Crisis Center, which will expand the University’s School of Nursing and house a Security Sciences Institute, complementing the Lincoln University Law Enforcement Training Academy and criminal justice program.

Dr. John B. Moseley

According to Lincoln University Board of Curators President Victor Pasley, Moseley has also initiated relationships with key educational and scholarship partners for the University. he has cultivated and strengthened relationships between the University and alumni, faculty, staff, students, state and federal partners.

“I am humbled to serve the students, faculty and alumni of Lincoln University in this role,” said Moseley. “This University has always helped students achieve their dreams. I am grateful to be part of a team working together to accomplish that aim, providing financial, academic and social resources. The need for what Lincoln University provides has never been more important and we will continue to address every challenge to better serve our students and the community.”

Dr. Moseley is the second white male to currently serve as president at an HBCU, joining Robin Capehart at Bluefield State College in Bluefield, West Virginia.


HCF Founder, President & CEO, Demetrius Johnson Jr., says that he is confident in the appointment of Dr. John B. Moseley as President of Lincoln University. “I am confident in the appointment of Dr. John Moseley, and I thank the Lincoln University of Missouri Board of Curators for their decision-making in this process. I affirm that Dr. Moseley’s leadership will bring Lincoln University back to higher heights. The John Moseley that I know was the one I worked with between 2018 and 2019 on LU’s campus, the one that was AD/Head Men’s Basketball Coach and dedicated to providing support, leadership, and affectionateness for the student-athletes that were under his wing. He has always been very welcoming and approachable, as well as well-spoken. I wish Dr. Moseley the best of luck during his tenure.”


A historically Black, 1890 Land-Grant, public university, based in Jefferson City, Missouri, Lincoln University provides undergraduates and master’s level degree programs to a diverse student body of nearly 2,000. For more information, visit www.lincolnu.edu.

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Dr. Ivory A. Toldson

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Professor of counseling psychology at Howard University and author Ivory A. Toldson, Ph.D. has been recognized among the nation’s top scholars in education in the 2022 Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings. The annual list ranks the top 200 scholars based on their influence on academic scholarship and public debate as reflected in old and new media.

The ranking is meant to recognize and encourage scholars who successfully merge education scholarship with policy and practice. A scholar and advocate for education, Toldson’s ranking is emblematic of his longstanding efforts to do just that. The author of numerous publications, Toldson’s 2019 book, “No BS (Bad Stats): Black People Need People Who Believe in Black People Enough Not to Believe Every Bad Thing They Hear about Black People,” explores how the common data used to make decisions about Black students is misinformed and offers alternative ways to approach the use of data in pursuit of educational equity.

“Today, I’m working with school districts to help them understand data and how data can be used in responsible ways to understand issues of racial injustice and equity in their schools,” said Toldson. “I’m also doing a lot in STEM education, working with HBCUs in particular to make sure that funding for STEM education and research is equitable.”

For five years, Toldson was president of Quality Education for Minorities (QEM) Network, a nonprofit dedicated to improving education from underrepresented students. He is also the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Negro Education and the executive editor of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Research, published by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc. Most recently, he was tapped as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Toldson described his work with the NAACP as “the embodiment of scholar-activisim is national in scope with hyper-local footprint.” To combat the greatest challenges in our education system, Toldson will oversee national strategies to leverage the power of NAACP’s 2,200 local branches and 2.2 million constituents to empower Black learners.

The Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings is in its 12th year of publication and is created by American Enterprise Institute director of education policy studies and Education Week blogger Frederick M. Hess. The ranking metrics are formulated using nine publicly available sources, including Google Scholar, Amazon, Twitter, books, syllabi, press mentions, web mentions, newspaper mentions, and congressional record mentions.

Read more about the 2022 Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings here.

About Howard University
Founded in 1867, Howard University is a private, research university that is comprised of 14 schools and colleges. Students pursue more than 140 programs of study leading to undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees. The University operates with a commitment to Excellence in Truth and Service and has produced one Schwarzman Scholar, three Marshall Scholars, four Rhodes Scholars, 12 Truman Scholars, 25 Pickering Fellows and more than 165 Fulbright recipients. Howard also produces more on-campus African American Ph.D. recipients than any other university in the United States. For more information, visit www.howard.edu.

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Dr. Cynthia Warrick, president of Stillman College, signs a MOU with Southern Illinois University’s School of Law as Dr. Mark McCormick, Stillman College provost, looks on. (Photo credit: David Miller/Stillman College)

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. – Stillman College and Southern Illinois University Carbondale have signed a memorandum of understanding to help students from the historically Black liberal arts college enroll and earn a degree from the SIU School of Law, with the aim of diversifying the legal profession.

Increasing diversity among attorneys: SIU Carbondale and Stillman College officials sign an agreement to help Stillman students enroll and earn degrees from the SIU School of Law. Participating in the ceremony from SIU were (at table from left): Wendell Williams, associate chancellor of enrollment management; Camille Davidson, dean, SIU School of Law; Chancellor Austin Lane, and Meera Komarraji, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs. On the screen are Stillman College President Cynthia Warrick, Stillman alumna and attorney Shalyn McKitt, and Lizette Chevalier, SIU associate provost for academic programs. (Photo credit: Russell Bailey/SIU)

Parties from both Stillman College and SIU School of Law formalized their agreement Wednesday. Stillman is the first HBCU to establish a student pipeline program with SIU School of Law.

“This program will allow selected students to participate in a summer pre-law program to expose them to the rigor and policies of law school admissions,” said Dr. Cynthia Warrick, Stillman College President.

“We are also looking to advance similar programs in pre-health professions for students in Stillman’s Biomedical Academy with SIU. Collaborative efforts like this will ensure Stillman students are competitive for entry and success in law school and other professional programs. We are grateful to SIU for creating this opportunity.”

Under the agreement, SIU and Stillman College, SIU and Stillman College, a 761-student institution in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, will engage in collaborative academic activities with the SIU School of Law that promote a path for Stillman College students to enroll in the law school and earn their law degree. The MOU also includes other options for students considering how they can continue their education after earning their bachelor’s degrees.

Camille Davidson, dean of SIU’s School of Law, noted that about two-thirds of minority applicants who apply to the law school are not accepted primarily due to low Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores. In October 2021, there were 246 students in the law school, of which 17, or 7%, were Black. The law school had 41 minority students, including women, last fall.

“We are committed to being an anti-racist and inclusive law school,” said Davidson. “The only way to have real access to justice is to train attorneys from various backgrounds. Students from underrepresented populations are often not exposed to the study of law, and many who are interested are not prepared for the application and admissions process. Building partnerships with HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions, like Stillman, will help SIU School of Law become more diverse.”

SUMMER PROGRAM ALSO PLANNED

A summer program will bring 15 college students from across the country to SIU’s campus, May 25-29, to explore legal careers, understand the law school application process and begin to prepare for the LSAT while honing skills necessary for law school, such as understanding how to read and analyze a case, Davidson said.

“We will answer ‘Why law school?” We want to provide these students with the resources to be successful in applying to and graduating from law school,” Davidson said. “Like SIU, Stillman is located in a rural area and many of the students are first-generation college students.”

About Stillman College
Stillman College is a liberal arts institution with a historical and formal affiliation with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It is committed to fostering academic excellence, to providing opportunities for diverse populations, and to maintaining a strong tradition of preparing students for leadership and service by fostering experiential learning and community engagement designed to equip and empower Stillman’s students and its constituents. For more information, visit www.stillman.edu.

About Southern Illinois University Carbondale
SIU embraces a unique tradition of access and opportunity, inclusive excellence, innovation in research and creativity, and outstanding teaching focused on nurturing student success. As a nationally ranked public research university and regional economic catalyst, we create and exchange knowledge to shape future leaders, improve our communities, and transform lives. For more information, visit www.siu.edu.

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Chair Appointment Marks a Historic First for Board

Dr. Laurence B. Alexander, chancellor of University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.

President Joe Biden has announced his intent to appoint new members of the Board for International Food and Agricultural Development (BIFAD), including University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) Chancellor Laurence B. Alexander as Chair. BIFAD is a seven-member, presidentially appointed advisory committee to USAID to ensure it brings the assets of U.S. universities to bear on development challenges in agriculture and supports their representation in USAID programming.

Dr. Alexander’s appointment as BIFAD Chair marks the first time the board is chaired by a leader of an 1890 land grant university, acknowledging the valuable contributions of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and presenting an opportunity to further strengthen USAID’s partnerships with HBCUs and other U.S. Minority Serving Institutions.

“Thank you to President Biden for this appointment. I’m honored to serve in this capacity,” said Chancellor Alexander. “As Chancellor of Arkansas’ only land-grant HBCU institution, our mission is steeped in innovation and discovery. This BIFAD appointment will be an excellent opportunity to expand awareness about the leading industry in the state of Arkansas – agriculture. In addition, it will further expand awareness about the research and extension mission of land-grant universities, and specifically about UAPB’s Initiatives, such as the agriculture and aquaculture research in which our renowned faculty are engaged, as well as our outreach services to small farmers in the state.”

Along with the appointment of Dr. Alexander as Chair, President Biden also appointed the following new members: Dr. Marie Boyd, Associate Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina; Dr. Rattan Lal, 2020 World Food Prize Laureate, Distinguished University Professor of Soil Science, and Director of the Center for Carbon Management and Sequestration at The Ohio State University; Dr. Saweda Liverpool-Tasie, Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at Michigan State University; Ms. Henri Moore, Vice President and Head of Responsible Business, GSK Consumer Health; and Ms. Kathy Spahn, President and Chief Executive Officer of Helen Keller International. The announcement also extends the appointment of Dr. Pamela Anderson, Director General Emerita of the International Potato Center.

Serving as thought leaders and conveners of diverse expert dialogues, the Board has recently provided evidence-based recommendations to UASID on protecting and advancing nutrition and food security outcomes during COVID-19 response and recovery; improving the agricultural sector and food security in conflict-affected and fragile contexts; and measuring the benefits of global agricultural development investment on the U.S. economy.

Dr. Alexander received national recognition as one of the ‘Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders’ of 2019 by the HBCU Campaign Fund.

About the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB)
The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff is a public comprehensive HBCU 1890 Land-Grant Institution. The University embraces its land-grant mission of providing cutting edge research, teaching, outreach, and service programs that respond to the social and economic needs of the state and region. Its mission is to promote and sustain excellent academic programs that integrate quality instruction, research, and student learning experiences responsive to the needs of a racially, culturally, and economically diverse student population. Ultimately, the University is dedicated to providing access and opportunity to academically deserving students and producing graduates who are equipped to excel through their contributions and leadership in a 21st century national and global community. For more information, visit www.uapb.edu.

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We are asking for alumni, friends, and supporters to unite around the world to support students, higher education, and the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF).

How YOU Can Help Us Support Higher Education with HCF? This is how you can help below.

$35-$50 Inform & Engage HBCU Campaigners: Your gift of $50 allows HCF to continue sending out our newsletters, producing content for social media and other communications to connect supporters to our advocacy mission.

$125 Annual HBCU Football & Recruitment Tour: Your gift allows us to fund our Annual HBCU Football & Recruitment Tour to support HBCU football classics and assist with recruiting students to HBCUs during the fall season.

$260 Board Meetings & Sponsored Workshops: Your gift allows HCF to support  board meeting and sponsored workshops.

$550 Support Organizational & Staff Needs: As we continue to grow, your gift will contribute to our organizational and staff needs including our website.

$1000 Scholarships & Institution Support: Your gift allow us to provide scholarships to high school and current students at HBCUs as well as support the HBCUs and MSIs we serve.

Students participating in NASA’s MITTIC Challenge showcase their spinoff technology concepts in a poster session at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Credits: NASA.

NASA and the Department of Education are collaborating to enhance the federal Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Scholar Recognition Program using NASA entrepreneurial expertise.

Beginning in 2022, a NASA pitch competition for students at higher education institutions will officially become part of the HBCU Scholar Recognition Program, part of the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence, and Economic Opportunity. The competition will be a small-scale version of NASA’s Minority University Education and Research Program (MUREP) Innovation and Tech Transfer Idea Competition (MITTIC).

“NASA is excited to formalize our participation and see the innovated ideas HBCU scholars will bring to the competition.” said MUREP manager Torry Johnson. “Since 2018, MITTIC has provided students at Minority Serving Institutions a glimpse into NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and a unique opportunity to explore their entrepreneurial interests using NASA’s technology portfolio.”

Through this “mini MITTIC” pitch competition, teams of HBCU scholars will investigate selected NASA intellectual properties for potential uses in the commercial sector. The teams will work closely with NASA’s MITTIC team and subject matter experts while creating “Space Tank” pitches to explain the commercial viability of their proposed ideas.

NASA has a long history of facilitating the transformation of its technologies into commercial products and services. NASA’s Technology Transfer Program, managed by the Space Technology Mission Directorate, the agency’s headquarters in Washington, ensures that the innovations developed for exploration and discovery are broadly available to the public, maximizing the benefit to the nation.

Through the HBCU Scholar Recognition Program, the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence, and Economic Opportunity annually recognizes students from HBCUs for their accomplishments in academics, leaderships, and civic engagement. Over the course of an academic school year, HBCU scholars participate in professional development through monthly classes and have access to a network of public and private partners.

Partnerships, such as the White House initiative’s work with NASA, have helped increase participation in and awareness of the HBCU Scholar Recognition Program.

“Our relationship with NASA validates the Biden-Harris Administration’s and the initiative’s commitment to enhancing STEM in the HBCU space,” said Arthur McMahan, senior associate director for the initiative. “This opportunity provides our outstanding HBCU Scholars with the tools and experiences needed to succeed in the 21st Century economy and beyond.”

Through their relationship with NASA, community-based organizations, and other public and private partners, HBCU scholars will also share promising and proven practices that support opportunities for all young people to achieve their educational and career potential.

The 2022 HBCU scholar application is expected to be released Jan. 11, 2022. The initiative will provide more information about the activities of the HBCU scholars on its website. HBCU scholars will begin working with NASA as soon as they are accepted into the recognition program and present their team pitches during the Annual National HBCU Week Conference in September.

For more on the Space Technology Mission Directorate and NASA’s Technology Transfer Program, visit https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/home/index.html.

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. – Speaker of the Alabama House of Representatives Mac McCutcheon has appointed Drake State President Dr. Patricia Sims to the Alabama Partnership for Children (APC) Board of Directors. Sims, as President of an Alabama public two-year college, will represent all 24 schools within the Alabama Community College System.

Dr. Patricia Sims, president of Drake State Community & Technical College.

“Dr. Sims has such a broad and deep career in education,” said APC Executive Director Gail Piggott. “She is recognized as a community leader, exemplary administrative head, and someone who promoted building the workforce so that families can thrive.”

Dr. Sims has dedicated her career to education at multiple levels including primary to 12th grade, community college, and university.

“Education is my life’s work and I am honored to serve an organization that is committed to serving Alabama’s families,” said Sims. “The Alabama Community College System provides a unified system of institutions dedicated to delivering academic education, adult education, and workforce development. By providing an impact at an earlier stage, students in pre-kindgarten to high school will be able to gain the support and training needed to enter the workforce.”

The Alabama Partnership for Children relies on community colleges for the early childhood programs that help develop highly skilled teachers for the early childhood sector. Institutions like Drake State also help build skills and competencies for families to improve their livelihoods and incomes.

“Dr. Sims involvement with young people and her interest in their success dovetails perfectly with the vision statement of the Alabama Partnership for Children that ‘every Alabama child will have the opportunity to succeed in life,” said APC Board Chairperson Trippy McGuire. “We welcome Dr. Sims as a new member of our board and look forward to her lending her expertise and enthusiasm to our organization.”

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Dear Supporters,

We are needing your help. Our charge at HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is to work tirelessly to assist students and higher education. Thank you for your unwavering support throughout the years of our organization’s existence; we were able to make dreams come true. Furthermore, as we continue our mission to remain strong advocates for students and HBCUs, we would like your continued support to become an HBCU Campaign Fund donor in helping us in the longevity fight in strengthening the HBCU space.

Our mission is to fundraise a goal of $50,000 while instituting initiative programming and partnerships in support of HBCUs and their communities. We’ll accomplish those goals by providing scholarships, endowments and enhancing the significance of those who our organization supports.

Our fundraising campaigns focus on raising funding for students who have financial needs to continue their college education or assist the organization with the necessary financing for providing initiative programming to students and HBCUs. Your contribution is critical and beneficial to many individuals supported through HCF who fall short financially. Our goal is to assist as many individuals in need and ensure that they accomplish their dreams.

We are calling on all HBCU alumni, friends, affinity groups, and education supporters to help us support students going to college and keep them in college by supporting the HBCU Campaign Fund with a generous gift to continue the proposed dreamed mission.

If you would like to become a donor, you can make an online donation at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/donate. You may donate directly below or mail to HBCU Campaign Fund, 12558 S. Princeton Ave, Chicago, IL 60628-7225. Your donation will provide access to the key of education for many students who are achieving their goals to success. We Are HBCUs.

Yours Sincerely,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
Founder, President and CEO
HBCU Campaign Fund

FedEx Corp. (NYSE: FDX), the world’s largest express transportation company, is supporting free admission to the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and Museum of Mississippi History on Monday, January 17, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The museums will also be free on Sunday, January 16.

“We are grateful to FedEx for their continued support of our annual Martin Luther King Jr. celebration,” said Katie Blount, director of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

“At FedEx, we believe that when we connect people and possibilities, we can change the world,” said Rose Flenoral, manager of Global citizenship at FedEx Services. “We are proud to support free public admission to the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and Museum of Mississippi History, to help visitors connect Dr. King’s legacy, and leave inspired to drive positive changes of their own.”

The museums will open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday, January 17. Museum hours for Sunday, January 16, are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Safety precautions at the museums include requiring all visitors to wear face masks and observe social distancing guidelines while inside the building.

At 6 p.m. on Monday, January 17, join us for the annual MLK Night of Culture program in the Craig H. Neilsen Auditorium of the Two Mississippi Museums. This year’s theme is “Those Who Stayed” inspired by the stories in the individuals who remained in Mississippi during the Great Migration, a population movement of African Americans who left their homes to seek better opportunities in the northern and western states in response to racial injustice in the rural South. The event is free and includes live poetry and performances by Jackson State University’s MADDRAMA theatre troupe, Hinds Community College’s MONTAGE Theatre of Dance, and other featured artists. Seating is limited. The event will also be streamed live on the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum Facebook page.

Dr. King’s involvement in Mississippi included attending the funeral of NAACP state field secretary Medgar Evers in 1963, visiting Greenwood in support of Mississippi Freedom Summer in 1964, and testifying in support of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) during the 1964 Democratic National Convention.

For more information, call 601-576-6850 or email info@mdah.ms.gov.

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CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) has released its annual The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders Award & Class. The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders Award & Class is a national recognition ranking that was created by the HBCU Campaign Fund, a non-profit that advocates for historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

The dynamics of higher education in America today are driving the demand for a new set of skills and capabilities for tomorrow leaders. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) provide a high-quality education to low-income, first-generation, and academically underprepared students. Also, these institutions as such serve a diverse population while maintaining the role as the backbone of higher education and well underrepresented for more than a 150-year history.

According to HCF’s Founder, President & CEO, Demetrius Johnson Jr., the fifth selected group of leaders have “proven their responsibilities for shaping policies, changing perspectives, and making decisions that affect millions of individuals in the higher education space, and the daily needs of what an HBCU or Minority-Serving Institutions contributes.”

The organization has identified ten chancellors and presidents currently serving an HBCU or MSI, who exemplify a prominent and influential role in leadership and model the characteristics of the following responsibilities in the progression of effectively moving an institution forward.

In addition, the organization announced the inaugural Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr. Trailblazers of Higher Education Award among The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders. A new honor that will recognize a current or retiring/retired president or chancellor that serve(s) a HBCU or MSI and upholds decade-long value and contributions to the field of higher education.

Receiving the inaugural award are retiring presidents Dr. Andrew Hugine, Jr., of Alabama A&M University, and Dr. William R. Harvey of Hampton University. Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr. is also among Hugine and Harvey to receive the honor.

HCF Honors AAMU’s 11th President Dr. Andrew Hugine, Jr. as One of Its First Trailblazers of Higher Education Honorees Among Its Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders Award Recipients and Fifth Class

“This is a delightful time for us at HCF as we approach revealing the fifth class of honorees for the annual award recognition. As a student under Dr. Davis’ leadership, I appreciate all of his contributions to our beloved Dear Mother and am honored to acknowledge him in such a prestigious way,” said HC President & CEO, Demetrius Johnson Jr. “I commend Dr. Hugine and Dr. Harvey on a magnificent job well done for the roles that they’ve played at their institutions, and this could not be more than special to salute them for their leadership. We congratulate them both on their retirements and send our very best wishes.”

Click here to view the Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2022 award recipients and fifth-class honorees.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund

The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded in 2012 and is a non-profit educational organization that remains a strong advocate for students and higher education. The mission of HCF is to support the significance and raise funds for scholarships, programs, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

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It’s with heavy heart to learn of the passing of former Zoo Director Dr. Lester E. Fisher, who passed away at the age of 100 on December 22. He remarkably transformed the notion of what a zoo is during his 30-year tenure as zoo director of Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, emphasizing the importance of education and conservation while furthering animal welfare and care.

Under his 30-year tenure, Fisher emphasized the importance of educating the public about the role zoos serve in society as conservation powerhouses. Visiting the zoo became an educational journey. He also encouraged animal care staff to further their education and hired experts who had the proper knowledge to provide world-class care.

Chicago has lost one of its greatest giants of humanity, Dr. Lester Fisher. His magnificent life and treasures mean everything to the world and the space of zoology. He was the man with the plan, and he laid the foundation for what Lincoln Park Zoo is today, building the first Great Ape House. It graces his name Dr. Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes, known as one of the world’s leading ape behavior and science centers.

Dr. Fisher, who had a affinity for gorillas, spent time studying in Africa. In 1976, the zoo opened the Lester E. Fisher Great Ape House, where it continues to work with lowland gorillas. Under Fisher’s leadership, Lincoln Park Zoo “was home to the largest gorilla population in North America.”

As Zoo Director, Dr. Fisher is also credited with transforming the zoo into a state-of-the-art institution by renovating animal buildings and habitats, improving education around the animals and increasing conservation efforts.

Dr. Fisher worked at Lincoln Park Zoo nearly 45 years, starting in 1947 and later serving as the zoo’s director from 1962 until he retired in 1992. He is noted as the zoo’s first veterinarian.

The HBCU Campaign Fund organization joins the Lincoln Park Zoo family in extending our sincere condolences and thoughts to the Fisher family and friends during this time. We are more than grateful for his remarkable life and the many he has influenced. May Dr. Fisher’s legacy continue to be honored in our hearts going into the New Year, and for Lincoln Park Zoo to continue to carry on with his cherishable contributions forevermore.

With sympathy,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
Founder, President & CEO

Wishing you a joyous holiday season! Because of your continuous generous support of the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF), you have given us so many reasons to say “Thank You” this holiday season.

On the behalf of everyone at the HCF, we hope you have a safe and very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. We thank you for all you do to help us support students and higher education, especially on the fight to Campaign For HBCUs. YOU are the reason that the fight continues and that successes happens at our nation HBCU institutions, and we can’t think of a better gift than that.

Always remember that our supporters is indeed very special to us, and we are forever grateful that we can always count on your support. So again, from all of us at HCF, the students, HBCUs, and MSIs who benefit from your support and advocacy in the fight, happy holidays!

Warmest regards this holiday season,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
Founder, President and CEO


Romanian university, UMES enter into academic, culture exchange agreement

A small, private university in eastern Romania and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore have signed an agreement to explore academic and cultural exchanges between the two institutions. Pictured: Dr. William B. Harvey and Dr. Heidi M. Anderson.

Danubius University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore have signed a partnership agreement to explore academic and cultural exchanges between the two institutions.

Prof. univ. Dr. William B. Harvey, Rector of Danubius University visited UMES campus for the signing ceremony of the agreement with UMES President Dr. Heidi M. Anderson and representatives of the university’s leadership.

Professor Harvey said that “the partnership with UMES brings to the fore the growing concern of Danubius University to expand its educational and cultural collaborations around the world for the benefit of Danubian students and faculty.”

“One of the main goals of UMES is to have graduates who are culturally and internationally aware, so our partnership with Danubius University is a step in that direction. When you talk about learning about different cultures, not in your own country, but in other countries, this broadens your horizons. Such an opportunity also trains tomorrow’s leaders from both universities,” said Dr. Heidi M. Anderson, President of UMES.

The agreement signed between the two higher education institutions outlines an appropriate framework for establishing exchange programs for students and graduates, as well as for faculty and for collaboration in the field of scientific research which is a priority for Danubius University.

Dr. Moses Kario, dean of UMES’ School of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, represented UMES in Mid-September on a fact-finding trip to Galati, where he attended an international conference on the impact of COVID-19 as well as met with a leading agriculture science official.

Danubius University is located in Galati, a city about 286,000 on the Danube River. The university has roughly 3,000 students, and offers several bachelor’s degrees and master’s programs.

Harvey was named Danubius’s chief executive officer – or “rector,” in European higher education job terminology – in January and maintains an office in Washington, D.C. He has taught or served as an administrator at such institutions as the University of Virginia, Stoney Brook (N.Y.) University, North Carolina State and the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. He has emerged as a leading voice who has pushed the higher education sector to focus on cultural and social factors affecting underserved populations.

Among the possibilities UMES and Danubius will explore are joint degree programs, ways to collaborate on best practices in teaching, assessment and institutional management and sharing technology expertise.

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CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) announced the creation of the inaugural Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr. Trailblazers of Higher Education Award among The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders, a new honor that will recognize a current or retiring/retired president or chancellor that serves a historically black college or university (HBCU) or minority-serving institution (MSI) that uphold decade-long value and contributions to the field of higher education.

Receiving the inaugural award are retiring presidents Dr. Andrew Hugine, Jr. of Alabama A&M University, and Dr. William R. Harvey of Hampton University. Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr. will also be among Hugine and Harvey to receive the honor.

The award will be named after the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff’s Chancellor Emeritus Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr. The recipients will have advanced the mission to drive change and inspire others. The individual has proven their responsibilities for shaping policies, changing perspectives, and making decisions that affect millions of people life’s in the higher education space.

Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr., Chancellor Emeritus of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.

“This is a delightful time for us at HCF as we approach revealing the fifth class of honorees for the annual award recognition. As a student under Dr. Davis’ leadership, I appreciate all of his contributions to our beloved Dear Mother and am honored to acknowledge him in such a prestigious way,” said HCF President & CEO, Demetrius Johnson, Jr. “I commend Dr. Hugine and Dr. Harvey on a magnificent job well done for the roles that they’ve played at their institutions, and this could not be more than special to salute them for their leadership. We congratulate them both on their retirements and send our very best wishes.”

A native of Pine Bluff, Dr. Davis received his formal education at the Arkansas AM&N Laboratory and Merrill schools. A true believer in education, Dr. Davis attended Arkansas AM&N (now UAPB), University of Arkansas, and completed his doctorate degree at Iowa State University. Originally a teacher of Mathematics and Physics, Dr. Davis worked across the United States, from the halls of Mississippi Valley State University to the halls of NASA, before returning to his hometown to become a professor at UAPB. In 1991, Davis was named Chancellor of the university by Dr. B. Alan Sugg, former President of the U of A System. A published researcher, receiver distinguished alum awards from UAPB, U of A-Fayetteville, and Iowa State, and an active community member, Dr. Davis made UAPB athletics one of his many platforms during his tenure with the institution, and made many strides in the advancement and promotion of the various athletic programs the university operates. During his tenure, the football stadium and adjoining field house were constructed and completed, as well as the baseball complex and the UAPB Soccer Field. He led the university through a period of academic growth and spearheaded the accreditation and reaccreditation of various academic programs throughout the university. He also led the construction of three new academic buildings in the center of campus, as well as the renovation and construction of on-campus housing. After 21 years of leading the university, Dr. Davis retired in 2012.

The Annual Most Dominant HBCU Leaders Award & Class is a national recognition ranking that was created by the HBCU Campaign Fund, a non-profit that advocates for historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority-serving institutions (MSIs). The recipients are honored for their prominent and influential role in leadership and displays the characteristics of the responsibilities in the progression of effectively moving an institution forward.

The Class of 2022 is excepted to be announced early January.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund
The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded in 2012 and is a non-profit educational organization that remains a strong advocate for students and higher education. The mission of HCF is to support the significance and raise funds for scholarships, programs, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

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Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) will send its football team to Canton, Ohio next labor day weekend for the third Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame and WSSU jointly announced the Rams’ participation in the Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic 2022 on Friday.The Rams’ athletics administration also announced that nine-year NFL veteran Robert Massey had been promoted from the position of interim head coach to head coach that same day.

The 2022 Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic tentatively is scheduled for Sept. 4 at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium. The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) has tentatively added the Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic to its 2022 Sixth Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour line-up.

WSSU’s opponent, along with ticket information and other details about the 2022 Black College Hall of Fame Classic weekend, will be announced in the comings weeks.

“We are thrilled to host Winston-Salem State University in the third Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic,” said Adrian Allison, Chief Relationship Officer at the Pro Football Hall of Fame. “Fans of the Classic can expect Coach Massey to bring an energetic team ready to kick off its season in the shadow of the shrine of football. Additionally, the school’s ‘Red Sea of Sound’ band will continue the tradition of having fans experience one of the best halftimes in sports.”

Robert Massey, head football coach at Winston-Salem State University.

Last season, the Rams finished in third place in the Southern Division of the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association with Massey serving under the title of interim head coach.

Massey has played nine season in the National Football League following his collegiate career at North Carolina Central University, where he was a standout defensive back who earned All-CIAA honors twice and All-American honors as a senior. He ended his playing days third on the team’s career interception list.

Selected in the second round of the 1989 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints, Massey was named to the 1989 NFL All-Rookie Team after starting all 16 games and contributing five inceptions on a team that finished with a 9-7 record. He also played for the Cardinals Lions, Jaguars and Giants.

Another NFL Legend, Eddie George, made his college coaching debut in Canton this year with Tennessee State. His Tiger fell to the Grambling State Tigers 16-10 in the second Black College Football Hall of Fame Classic.

In the inaugural Classic in 2019, Alabama A&M topped Morehouse 35-30 on a last-second touchdown pass.

The game in 2020 was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Dr. Glenda Glover, President of Tennessee State University.

NASHVILLE, TNTennessee State University’s President Dr. Glenda Glover has been appointed by President Joe Biden to serve as Vice Chair of the President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The Board will advance the goal of the HBCU Initiative, established by the Carter Administration, to increase the capacity of HBCUs to provide the highest-quality education to their students and continue serving as engines of opportunity.

The Biden-Harris Administration is committed to supporting the vital mission of HBCUs. Through the American Rescue Plan and by forgiving capital improvement debt of many of these institutions, the Biden-Harris Administration has already committed more than $4 billion in support. Reestablishing the White House HBCU Initiative – and placing strong leadership at the head of the Board – will allow the administration to build on the financial commitment with continued institutional support.

Dr. Glover serves as the eighth President of Tennessee State University, a position she has held since January 2013. Under her leadership as the university’s first female president, TSU has experience a significant increase in alumni and corporate giving, research funding, and academic offerings. The University has also received the Carnegie R2 “high research activity” designation with Dr. Glover at the helm. In 2020 during the pandemic, TSU set a school record with nearly $71 million in research funding.

Dr. Glover’s educational development began as a student at TSU, where she majored in mathematics. After graduating with honors with a Bachelors of Science degree, she pursued the Master of Business Administration from Clark Atlanta University. She then completed her doctorate in business from George Washington University, and later completed her law degree from Georgetown University. She is also a certified public accountant, and is one of only three African-American women to hold the Ph.D.-CPA-JD combination in the United States.

Her career also includes serving on boards of publicly traded corporations Pinnacle Financial Partners, The Lenox Group, Citigroup Student Loan Corporation, and First Guaranty Bancshares. Dr. Glover currently serves as a member of the Board of Commissioners of the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority.

Earlier this year, Dr. Glover was named one of the ‘Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders’ by the HBCU Campaign Fund.

About Tennessee State University
Founded in 1912, Tennessee State University is Nashville’s only public university, and is a premier, historically black university and land-grant institution offering 39 bachelor’s degree programs, 24 master’s degree programs and eight doctoral degrees. TSU is a comprehensive research intensive institution with a R-2 Carnegie designation, and has a graduate school on its downtown Avon Williams Campus, along with the Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnvile, Tennessee. With a commitment to excellence, Tennessee State University provides students with a quality education in a nurturing and innovative environment that prepares them as alumni to be global leaders in every facet of society. For more information, visit www.tnstate.edu.

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There’s still time for you to contribute to our Campaign For HBCUs Challenge and help us in reaching our fund goal of $50,000!

Your gift today will help ensure HCF can continue hitting the ground running in the New Year. We still have so much urgent advocacy and programming work to do if we going to help keep higher education evolving.

Please make your generous year-end gift today. Your gift will have triple the impact for higher education and have HCF to provide scholarship in the coming years.

Thank you for your compassion — now and always!

With appreciation,

Demetrius Johnson Jr.
Founder, President & CEO

Mahood Hall, home of the W. Paul Cole, Jr. School of Business at Bluefield State College. Photo courtesy of HCF’s Media Team.

BLUEFIELD, W.Va.Bluefield State College is celebrating another “first,” with the decision by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) to approve the College’s Master of Business Administration (MBA) program.

“Today’s decision by the Commission empowers Bluefield State College to launch the first graduate degree program in the College’s 126-year history,” said BSC President Robin Capehart. “By offering a graduate program, Bluefield State can now begin the process for pursuing university status.”

The College’s MBA program is designed for both business and non-business majors, and will be offered in an accelerated format with courses offered primarily through online delivery. Students can complete the 36-credit hour program in as little as 12 months.

“Building on Bluefield State College’s fully accredited undergraduate programs in the W. Paul Cole, Jr. School of Business, we are excited to expand into graduate education by offering a Master of Business Administration this spring to meet the educational needs of this region,” said Dr. Ted Lewis, BSC Provost. “By offering this program in a hybrid format, students will gain valuable seat time and opportunities for in-person interaction, engagement, and experiential learning as well as the ability to meet face to face with business leaders.”

The MBA program offered through BSC’s W. Paul Cole, Jr. School of Business will establish affordable and accessible graduate business education for residents of the region and beyond. Southern West Virginia employers surveyed by the Cole School of Business expressed strong support for the program. They saw the BSC MBA as a valuable way to help current employees strengthen their skills and business acumen, and facilitate the recruitment of new employees seeking to further their education while continuing to work.

“Bluefield State College is gratified and excited to announce we will be offering the MBA program through the W. Paul Cole, Jr. School of Business,” said Karen Grogan, the School’s Interim Dean. “The Master of Business Administration program will be offered, beginning in the Spring 2022 semester.”

The intent of the Cole School of Business is to seek program-specific accreditation of the MBA program at the earliest possible time. The undergraduate business program at BSC is already nationally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

About Bluefield State College
Bluefield State College, a historically black institution, is to prepare students for diverse professions, informed citizenship, community involvement, and public service in an ever-changing global society by providing an affordable, accessible opportunity for public higher education through certificate, associate, bachelor, and master degree programs. For more information, visit www.bluefieldstate.edu.

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ITTA BENA, MSMississippi Valley State University‘s (MVSU) President, Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Sr., has announced that MVSU has received the university’s largest single private gift in school history.

An anonymous donor has made a gift of $2.5 million to support the university’s Finish Line initiative, a scholarship program that assists students in their matriculation to graduation. The gift is the donor’s second to the university this year; the first gift was $250,000.

Mississippi Valley State University President, Dr. Jerryl Briggs.

“Words cannot fully describe how excited and appreciative we are at MVSU,” said Dr. Briggs. “This transformational gift will allow us to continue our commitment to ‘students first’ in pursuing academic achievements. Great things are happening at MVSU. This gift ensures that Valley stays in motion and further allows the university to remain committed to its motto, ‘live for service.’ In addition, this gift will enable students who need financial help, realize their fullest potential and continue their enrollment at the university.”

After receiving the first gift, the university created the Prosperity Scholarship to record the distribution of the funds. All funds from the second gift will be distributed similarly, with the sole purpose and use of fund being to support student scholarships.

The Finish Line Initiative will additionally be used to allow those students who did not receive any scholarship funding at the start of their enrollment at the university but are now excelling academically and actively involved in community activism to receive scholarship support.

“This expansion of the Prosperity Scholarship is for continuing students who have distinguished themselves through outstanding leadership qualities and academic excellence. The primary focus of the award is leadership, which may be demonstrated through traditional school activities, work responsibilities, community activism and involvement, and family commitments,” Briggs continued.

About MVSU
Mississippi Valley State University, as a Carnegie Classified Master’s University, provides comprehensive undergraduate and graduate programs in education, the arts and sciences, and professional studies. The University is driven by its commitment to excellence in teaching, learning, service, and research —- a commitment resulting in a learner-centered environment that prepares critical thinkers, exceptional communicators, and service-oriented, engaged, and productive citizens. MVSU is fundamentally committed to positively impacting the quality of life and creating extraordinary educational opportunities for the Mississippi Delta and beyond. For more information, visit www.mvsu.edu.

Dr. Kemba Chambers, President of H. Councill Trenholm State Community College.

MONTGOMERY, AL – On Wednesday, Alabama Community College System Chancellor Jimmy H. Baker announced the appointment of Dr. Kemba Chambers as President of H. Councill Trenholm State Community College. Chambers is the first female to serve in this capacity at the college.

Chambers has 25 years of higher education experience and currently serves as Interim President at Trenholm. She previously served as Interim Associate Vice Chancellor of Teaching and Learning and Chief Instructional Officer at the Alabama Community College System, and Executive Vice President and Vice President of Instructional Services at Trenholm State. Chambers has served in various leadership roles at four of Alabama’s community colleges including serving as Interim President at Coastal Alabama Community College in Bay Minette and J.D. Drake State Community and Technical College in Huntsville. She also served at Calhoun Community College in Decatur and Chattahoochee Valley Community College in Phenix City.

“The future of Trenholm State is bright with Dr. Chambers at the helm,” Baker said. “Her familiarity with the college combined with her vision and commitment to creating opportunity for students and the greater community, makes her the ideal leader for Trenholm State.”

Chambers earned an Associate of Arts degree from Chattahoochee Valley Community College and a Bachelor of Science in Secondary Mathematics Education from Columbus State University. She earned a Master of Science in Secondary Mathematics Education from Troy University, an Educational Specialist in Educational Leadership from Troy University, and a Doctorate of Education in Higher Education Administration from Auburn University.

“Opportunities abound at Trenholm State and it’s an honor to serve as President at the college at such an exciting time,” said Chambers. “I look forward to working alongside not only our outstanding faculty, staff, and students at Trenholm but with community leaders across the River Region to continue to provide opportunities for a better future through education and workforce training.”

Dr. Chambers’ tenure as President at H. Councill Trenholm State Community College will begin on December 15, 2021.

About H. Councill Trenholm State Community College
H. Councill Trenholm State Community College is a comprehensive two-year community college located in Montgomery, Alabama. The College provides technical certificate and degree programs; adult learning opportunities; civic, social, cultural and personal development opportunities; business and industry training opportunities; and support of economic development for the central Alabama region. The College is part of the Alabama Community College System, a statewide system of postsecondary colleges governed by the Alabama Board of Education. For more information, visit www.trenholmstate.edu.

Pharrell Williams

NORFOLK, VA Norfolk State University is pleased to announce that Virginia native Pharrell Williams will deliver the keynote address at NSU’s 107th Commencement Exercise, which will honor the December graduates in the Class of 2021. The in-person commencement ceremony will be held on campus at 9 a.m., on Saturday, December 11, at Joseph G. Echols Memorial Hall. It will also be live streamed on the University’s website at www.nsu.edu.

A visionary recording artist, producer, songwriter, philanthropist, fashion designer, and entrepreneur, Pharrell Williams has been a creative force in the music industry and beyond for more than two decades.

Over the years, Williams has been honored with 13 Grammy Awards, including Producer of the Year in the 2004, 2014 and 2019; and ASCAP’s prestigious Golden Note Award in 2012. In 2014, his original song “Happy,” featured in Despicable Me 2, also received an Academy Award nomination. In 2017, he received an Academy Award nomination for co-producing Best Picture-nominated Hidden Figures (2016), as well as a Golden Globe nomination for co-scoring the film. In the summer of 2020, Williams was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame along with Chad Hugo for their work as The Neptunes.

In April 2019, Williams launched Something in the Water, the first-ever multi-day music festival and cultural experience on the beach in his hometown of Virginia Beach. The festival’s mission was to unite the community and celebrate the diversity and magic of Virginia Beach. It also was an opportunity to bring the best of what Williams has encountered around the world back to his hometown.

A longtime advocate again racial injustice, Williams was an integral part in the talks with Virginia Governor Ralph Northam about Juneteenth being a permanent paid state holiday. Virginia has long marked Juneteenth by issuing a proclamation, but the date has not previously been considered a state holiday. In June 2021, Williams joined Governor Northam at a press conference at which he announced his plans to do just that. Since the press conference, he continues to push other states and companies to do the same and remains at the forefont of the fight for racial equality across the country.

At the ceremony, Norfolk State will award Williams a Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degree. Additionally, NSU will confer degrees for nearly 400 candidates, who have completed the requirements for associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral degrees.

To attend the ceremony, all invited guests must have a ticket, which is provided by their prospective graduate. Norfolk State University also requires proof of vaccination, or a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of the commencement ceremony. Attendees should plan to bring their government ID, vaccination card, proof or COVID-19 test result.

For more information or to ask questions, visit www.nsu.edu/commencement or email commencement@nsu.edu.

About Norfolk State University
Norfolk State University, a comprehensive urban public institution, is committed to transforming students’ lives through exemplary teaching, research and service. Offering a supportive academic and culturally diverse environment for all, the University empowers its students to turn their aspirations into reality and achieve their full potential as well rounded, resourceful citizens and leaders for the 21st century. For more information, visit www.nsu.edu.

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Jackson State University Punches Ticket to ESPN Events’ Cricket Celebration Bowl for the First Time in School History

ATLANTA, GA – The second invitation to ESPN Events’ sixth annual Cricket Celebration Bowl – to be played Saturday, Dec. 18 at noon ET at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta and aired live on ABC – has been extended to the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) college football champion Jackson State University. The Tigers (11-1, 8-0 SWAC) defeated the Prairie View A&M Panthers on Saturday, 27-10, and will play the MEAC champion South Carolina State.

Executive Director of the Cricket Celebration Bowl, John Grant, was on-site at the SWAC Championship in Jackson, Miss., to present Jackson State head coach Deon Sanders with the official invitation.

“Congratulations to SWAC champion Jackson State University for punching its ticket to the Cricket Celebration Bowl,” said Grant. “Jackson State, led by Coach Sanders, had an outstanding season. We are excited for the Tigers to join us in the championship matchup against the MEAC champion South Carolina State Bulldogs.”

Jackson State University captured the 2021 SWAC Football Championship on Saturday, Dec. 4. Photo courtesy of HCF’s Media Team.

Entering its sixth year, the Cricket Celebration Bowl has established itself as a premier bowl game, celebrating the heritage, legacy, pageantry, and tradition of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The championship-style game between MEAC and SWAC champions is televised on ABC. ESPN Events collaborates with its sponsors and the Divine Nike Greek organizations to schedule the game’s ancillary events which includes a fan experience, community service projects, and more.

Since its debut in 2015, the Celebration Bowl is the only Division 1 Football Championship Subdivision bowl game. It serves as the annual championship game between the MEAC and SWAC conferences.

The Celebration Bowl is returning in 2021 after a one-year absence due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Celebration Bowl Games (2015-present):
2015 North Carolina A&T def. Alcorn State, 41-34
2016 Grambling State def. North Carolina Central, 10-9
2017 North Carolina A&T def. Grambling State, 21-14
2018 North Carolina A&T def. Alcorn State, 24-22
2019 North Carolina A&T def. Alcorn, 64-44

Fans can purchase tickets to the Cricket Celebration Bowl online at thecelebrationbowl.com or www.ticketmaster.com, or calling Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000. Prices range from $15 to $175 excluding taxes and fees. A fill list of events surrounding the game are available on the event’s website.

About ESPN Events
ESPN Events, a division of ESPN, owns and operates a large portfolio of 35 collegiate sporting events worldwide. The roster includes five early-season college football games, 17 college bowl games, 12 college basketball events, annd a college softball event, which accounts for approximately 400 hours of live programming, reaching almost 64 million viewers and attracting over 800,000 attendees each year. With satellite offie in Albuquerque, Birmingham, Boca Raton, Dallas-Forth Worth, Honolulu, Las Vegas, Montgomery and Tampa, ESPN Events builds relationships with conferences, schools and local communities, as well as providing unique experiences for teams and fans.

For more information, visit the official website, Facebook, Twitter or Youtube pages.

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FAIRFIELD, Ala. – The Miles College Board of Trustees voted to extend the contract of President Bobbie Knight to run through May 2024.

Trustees conducted President Knight’s performance review prior to the October 2021 board meeting and in that meeting voted to extend her contact an additional two years, Knight began her tenure at Miles College in August of 2019 as Interim President before being voted permanent on March 5, 2020.

During Knight’s tenure as president, the College has experienced two consecutive years of enrollment increases. The most recent addition brought the College’s total enrollment above 1,500 for the first time since 2017. Also, under President Knight’s leadership, the College has had an increase of over 500% in private gifts and more than 1100% in public and foundation grants. The College also increased its endowment to an all time high and has been rated one of the top 10 most fiscally stable HBCUs in the nation.

“Miles is fortunate to have President Knight at this critical time. Her strategic approach to goal-setting, her extensive corporate experience, and her warm and engaging personality are assets that have already benefited the College,” said Trustee Board Chair, Bishop Teresa Jefferson Snorton. “We look forward to new initiatives that she will launch to assure Miles College students receive a quality education and college experience.”

“I am grateful that the Board of Trustees is allowing me to reimagine Miles College in the years to come,” Knight said. “I also appreciate the trust they have conferred upon me, and I look forward to maintaining my commitment to Miles College and her students.”

A formal inauguration is being planned for Spring 2022. The pandemic interrupted original plans in 2020. More details will be available at a later date.

About Miles College
Miles College, founded in 1898, is a premier liberal arts institution located in metropolitan Birmingham within the corporate limits of the City of Fairfield. The noble founders of the institution (the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church) saw education leadership as the paramount need in the black community. Miles, which is fully accredited by the Commission on College of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and accredited by Commission on Colleges for the awarding of Baccalaureate Degrees, is the only four-year institution in historic Birmingham, Alabama designated as a member of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU).

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Dr. Dennis E. Thomas, Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Commissioner.

LORMAN, MS – Dr. Dennis E. Thomas, Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Commissioner and Alcorn State University alumnus, will give the speech during Alcorn’s Fall 2021 Commencement Saturday, Dec. 11, at 9 a.m., at the Jack Spinks-Marino Casem Stadium.

A native of Heidelberg, Miss., Thomas earned his 20th year as MEAC Commissioner back in September. During his two decades of service, the conference has remained financially stable, strengthened institutional compliance, and improved student-athlete graduation rates. He’s gained distinction as one of the leasing collegiate administrators in America.

In a progressive move, Thomas inked a deal with GYO Score to create the conference’s esports community. He also executed his goal of purchasing the conference’s first office complex, which is headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia. The accomplishment marked the first time a Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) conference owned its headquartered property without assessing MEAC institutions. Thomas also accomplished another first when led the MEAC to become the first NCAA Division I FCS conference to institute instant replay during its televised regular-season football games.

Thomas’ mission to increase the conference’s corporate resources led to multi-year partnerships with Cricket Wireless, Russell Athletic Corporation, Coca-Cola, State Farm Insurance, Nike, Wells Fargo, ESPN, Jostens, United States Marines, Home Depot, Geico, Colgate Palmolive, Delta Airlines and the National Football League (NFL). Commissioner Thomas was instrumental in forging a partnership with the NFL to improve officiating and provide access to MEAC officials to advance to the next level. In May 2016, Commissioner Thomas also helped broker an off-the-field partnership between the NFL and the MEAC to boost opportunities for non-playing careers in professional football.

In 2017, the MEAC partnered with Collegiate Sports Management Group (CSMG), entering into a multi-year agreement in an effort to increase the conference’s corporate partnerships and branding. The relationship focuses on marketing and sponsorship rights, as well as helping to develop more national strategies across all avenues to assist with generating revenue for the conference and MEAC institutions.

Thomas was a four-year letterman in football and track and field in high school, and at the age of 16, he embarked upon a collegiate career that is still in the SWAC’s record books. In 1973, he made history as the first and only offensive lineman to be named the conference’s Offensive Player of the Year, beating out JSU’s Walter Payton for the honor. He finished his collegiate career as a three-year letterman at Alcorn State, a two-tome Pittsburgh Courier First Team All-American (1972-73), First Team Black Mutual Sports Network All-American (1973), and the Outstanding College Athlete of American (1974).

Thomas coached and played under the legendary coach Marino “The Godfather” Casem. During his playing and coaching tenure at Alcorn State, the Braves won SWAC football championships in 1970 as a player and 1976, 1979, and 1984 as an assistant coach.

Thomas was inducted into Hampton University’s inaugural Athletics Hall of Fame Class in 2009. He has also been enshrined into the Alcorn State University (Miss.) Hall of Fame (2010), the Southwestern Athletic Conference Hall of Fame (2003), and the Black College Football Hall of Fame (2020).

Thomas earned his bachelor’s degree from Alcorn State University. He later earned his master’s degree from the University of Louisiana at Monroe and his doctorate from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

An alumna of CSU, National Leader in the Education Community and, Passion for Equity in Education, Makes Jackson a Natural to Address the Fall 2021 Graduates

Dr. Janice K. Jackson, CEO of HOPE Chicago.

CHICAGO, ILDr. Janice K. Jackson will deliver Chicago State University‘s (CSU) 386th Commencement address on Dec. 16, 2021. The ceremony at the Emil & Patricia A. Jones Convocation Center is the university’s first in-person ceremony since 2019 and its return to in-person classes.

Jackson, a CSU alumna and the former CEO of Chicago Public Schools, was recently tapped as CEO of a newly formed nonprofit named HOPE Chicago. Launched in September 2021, HOPE Chicago, designed as a two-generation scholarship organization, will focus on the elimination of educational and economic equity barriers by guaranteeing debt-free college and wraparound support services to HOPE Scholars and their parents. The organization will pay the full cost of college for Scholars who are Chicago Public School graduates in need and offer the same support to a parent or guardian who desires to commence post-secondary programming. Seven CSU students were selected to participate in the inaugural cohort of the program. HOPE Chicago will also provide counseling mentoring, and career guidance to high school students.

“As an alumna of Chicago State University, we are thrilled to have Dr. Jackson address this year’s graduates,” said President Zaldwaynaka (“Z”) Scott, Esq. “She is a renowned education leader and visionary with a personal passion for transforming lives through education.”

Dr. Jackson, holds a B.A. in secondary education and an M.A. in history from CSU. Jackson also holds an M.A. in leadership and administration and a Ph.D. in education policy studies and urban school leadership. She began her 22-year career with CPS as a social studies teacher and debate team coach at South Shore High School. She served as a high school principal, District Network Chief, and Chief Education Officer in 2017, she was appointed CEO of CPS. She was the first CSU alumna to serve in the position.

About Chicago State University
Chicago State University (CSU), founded in 1867, is the oldest public university in the Chicago Metropolitan area. The University’s five colleges offer over 70 undergraduate and graduate degree-granting and non-degree programs. CSU is committed to equity in education, serving as the only U.S. Department of Education-designated four-year Predominantly Black Institution in Illinois and ranked by a Harvard economist in the top 4% of public and private universities nationwide in supporting our graduates’ economic mobility. The University serves as a prominent civic space on the greater South Side of Chicago by hosting a multitude of athletic, educational, cultural, and recreational activities. The University is located near public transit that provides convenient access to the campus.

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Bluefield State College President Robin Capehart

BLUEFIELD, WV – Two years after a candid discussion with Bluefield State College employees about the school’s formidable financial challenges, BSC President Robin Capehart detailed the marked improvement that has occurred since that time.

During a November 19, 2021 address to an in-person audience in the Hebert Gallery and to a virtual audience online, the BSC President recalled, “When the November 2019 meeting took place, many believed the purpose was to announce massive layoffs or, even, the closing of the school.” Citing a 40% decline enrollment over eight years (2011-2019), Capehart said the College’s cumulative financial index, or CFI, (a measure of the institution’s financial stress) was the wrong among all public colleges in West Virginia.

“In 2019, we told the campus community that we still had to face the reality that, in the highly competitive higher education marketplace, closing colleges had become a regular occurrence,” he continued. “But then, we reassured the campus that we had no intention of closing Bluefield State, but not just to survive, but to thrive. Tough decisions would have to be made that were consistent with sound business principles and a model for growth.”

“Since that time, we’ve done some things that we heard could not be done,” Capehart added, citing achievements that included establishing campus housing for the first time in 50+ years and launching 13 new sports (including the return of football for the first time since 1981). Additionally, Bluefield State’s financial condition has improved so markedly that BSC’s CFI now ranks second-highest among all state public colleges in West Virginia.

“We are the fastest growing college in West Virginia and, at least, one of the fastest growing Historically Black Colleges in the country,” the BSC President stated. The institution’s Fall 2021 headcount enrollment increase by 9.3%. An aggressive marketing program and the additions of housing and new athletics programs have contributed to a 244% increase in the number of out-of-state students attending Bluefield State, he observed. The number of states from which BSC attracted students rose from seven (Fall 2020) to 32 (Fall 2021).

“We still have much more work to do, and were looking forward to completing our strategic plan that will provide us a roadmap for the next few years,” President Capehart summarized. “But let’s pause for a moment just to be thankful for the blessings we’ve received over the past two years, and for me to offer – on behalf of our Board of Governors – a heartfelt thank you to the dedicated staff and faculty at Bluefield State University for all their efforts in making this renaissance a reality.”

About Bluefield State College
Bluefield State College, a historically black institution, is to prepare students for diverse professions, informed citizenship, community involvement, and public service in an ever-changing global society by providing an affordable, accessible opportunity for public higher education through certificate, associate, bachelor, and master degree programs. For more information, visit www.bluefieldstate.edu.

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FAIRFIELD, Ala. – Miles College will subsidize $3.9 million of federal student loans for a full-time students enrolled in the Spring 2022 academic semester with funds received from the Higher Education Emergency Fund (HEERF).

Instead of offering student direct federal loans, the College will alleviate some of the financial burdens of repaying students loans post-graduation by providing funding to minimize the number of students loans for its students.

“Our students have worked very hard to continue to thrive in a culture that many of us have not had to endure while being in college,” said Bobbie Knight, Miles College President. “We will continue to deploy as many resources as possible to support our students and ensure their success during and after their time at Miles College.”

The investment in Miles College reinforces the College’s commitment earlier this year when the College allocated funding to clear over $2.1 million in outstanding student balances.

“We understand how student loans are disproportionately impacting our students, and this is our first step in addressing the student loan crisis that many of our students face,” said Michael Johnson, Miles College Vice President of Enrollment Management. “Eliminating student loans for our students will help narrow the wealth gap and have a long-term impact on our students’ futures.”

The decision is the College’s first step to support their students navigating the student loan debt crisis. College officials are exploring opportunities to sustain these efforts with corporate and community partners.

About Miles College
Miles College, founded in 1898, is a premier liberal arts institution located in metropolitan Birmingham within the corporate limits of the City of Fairfield. The noble founders of the institution saw educated leadership as the paramount need in the black community. Miles, which is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and accredited by Commission on Colleges for the awarding of Baccalaureate Degrees, is the only four-year institution in historic Birmingham Alabama designated as a member of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU).

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Alabama A&M University’s 11th President, Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr., has been named one of the first HCF Trailblazers of Higher Education honorees among The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2022 Award recipients and fifth class.

CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is gearing up to reveal its annual The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders Award recipients and fifth class. The organization has announced that among the recipients is Alabama A&M University’s 11th President, Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr., who will retire after twelve years of leadership at the end of December 2021. Dr. Hugine will be honored as one of the first HCF Trailblazers of Higher Education recipients among The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2022 for his outstanding dedication to the space of higher education and his long record of accomplishments.

“A true trailblazer at heart and an outstanding leader beyond, we salute Dr. Hugine on a job well done for his dedication to the space of higher education. Holding twelve years of leadership at AAMU and more years in higher education, Dr. Hugine has proven to other leaders in the space that they can do it too,” said HBCU Campaign Fund’s Founder, President & CEO, Demetrius Johnson, Jr. “HCF is delighted to honor such a legendary individual as Dr. Hugine, and we commend him for his contributions. When consulting this year’s list of leaders, there was no other to consider honoring but Dr. Hugine, and we wish him the best on his retirement.”

Alabama A&M University 11th President, Dr. Andrew Hugine Jr. (Photo courtesy of AL.com)

Prior to Dr. Hugine’s appointment to AAMU, he served as President of South Carolina State University. Other positions held included Interim Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer; Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs; Director of Special Services Program; Director of University Year for Action Program-a service-learning program; Research Fellow; Assistant and Director of Institutional Self-Study; Professor of Mathematics; and high school mathematics teacher. He has been recognized both nationally and internationally for his leadership in education and adept administrative skills.

Since his appointment at AAMU, the University’s accreditation with SACSCOC has been reaffirmed; the financial status of the university has been strengthened; the university signed a $96 million dollar financing agreement with the U.S. Department of Education, the largest in the Department history, which was used to refinance existing debt and construct a new 580-bed student residence hall; enrollment has increased by 25.83% since Fall 2012 with Fall 2018 enrollment being 6,108, the Fall 2018 freshman Class of 1,521 is the highest in the University’s history, ten(10) new academic degree programs have been added; private funding has increased by 68% percent and the university has successfully completed a $27.3 million capital campaign; and more than two dozen memoranda of understanding have been signed with companies, governmental agencies and universities including one with the prestigious Confucius Institute.

Dr. Hugine earned a bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from South Carolina State University and a doctorate in Higher Education/Institutional Research from Michigan State University.

The Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders Award & Class is a national recognition that honors the outstanding work and leadership of chancellors and presidents of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and Minority-Serving Institutions. The individuals are selected for their leadership that plays a prominent and influential role in shaping policies, changing perspectives, and making decisions that affect millions of individuals’ lives in the higher education space and the daily needs of what an HBCU and MSI contributes.

The organization will reveal the remaining list of honorees of chancellors and presidents that currently serve an HBCU or MSI who play a prominent and influential role in leadership and displace the characteristics of the following responsibilities in the progression of effectively moving an institution forward as well as its second Trailblazer of Higher Education honoree in early January 2022.

About HBCU Campaign Fund
The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded in 20212 and is a nonprofit educational organization that remains a strong advocate for students and higher education. The mission of HCF is to support the significance and raise funds for scholarships, programs, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

About Alabama A&M University
Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University is a public, comprehensive 1890 Land-Grant institution, committed to access and opportunity, and dedicated to intellectual inquiry. The application of Knowledge and excellence in teaching, research and service is responsive to the needs of a diverse student population and the social and economic needs of the state and region. The University offers contemporary baccalaureate, master’s, educational specialist and doctoral level degrees to prepare students for careers in the arts, sciences, business, engineering, education, agriculture and technology. As a center of excellence, the University is dedicated to providing a student-centered educational environment for the emergence of scholars, scientists, leaders and critical thinkers, who are equipped to excel through their contributions and leadership in a 21st century national and global society. For more information, visit www.aamu.edu.

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FAIRFIELD, Ala.Miles College announced it has received a $250,000 grant from the Regions Foundation to help cover student tuition needs and pay for scholarship opportunities as students pursue their degree at Miles.

The Regions Foundation is a nonprofit initiative that is primarily funded by Regions Bank. The Foundation issues grants that prioritize more inclusive prosperity, including through education and workforce readiness.

The $250,000 grant from the Regions Foundation will not only support current students, but also students who previously attended Miles College in the fall of 2019 or prior and wish to return, but still have unpaid student balances.

“I am grateful for the continued support that the Regions Foundation has bestowed upon Miles College,” said Bobbie Knight, Miles College President. “This investment in our students has given them the opportunity to return and finish their degrees without worrying about past balances.”

Both the Regions Foundation and Regions Bank are committed to supporting Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The Miles grant is similar in size and scope to grants provided by the Regions Foundation to additional HBCUs this semester. Further, the Regions Foundation and Regions Bank have a clear commitment to supporting a wide range of programs and initiatives that promote greater racial equity and economic empowerment for communities of color.

“The Regions Foundation is committed to advancing education opportunities for students across our communities while removing barriers to success,” said Marta Self, executive director of the Regions Foundation. “Those barriers often include financial challenges in obtaining a degree, and our goal is to use the foundation’s resources in a way that connects more students with the opportunity to complete their education and pursue rewarding careers. For over 100 years, Miles College has prepared students to excel collegiately and professionally. This grant from the Regions Foundation will significantly impact students as they pursue and achieve successful, rewarding careers.”

About Miles College
Miles College, founded in 1898, is a premier liberal art institution located in metropolitan Birmingham within the corporate limits of the City of Fairfield. The noble founders of the institution saw educated leadership as the paramount need in the black community. Miles, which is fully accredited by the Commission of Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and accredited by Commission on Colleges for the awarding of Baccalaureate Degree, is the only four-year institution in historic Birmingham, Alabama designated as a member of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU).

About Regions Foundation
Regions Foundation supports community investments that positively impact the communities served by Regions Bank. The Foundation engages in a grantmaking program focused on priorities including economics and community development; education and workforce readiness; and financial wellness. The Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation funded primarily through contributions from Regions Bank.

About Regions Financial Corporation
Regions Financial Corporation (NYSE:RF), with $156 billion in assets, is a member of the S&P 500 Index and is one of the nation’s largest full-service providers of consumer and commercial banking, wealth management, and mortgage produces and services. Regions serve customers across the South, Midwest and Texas, and through its subsidiary, Regions Bank, operates more than 1,300 banking offices and approximately 2,000 ATMs. Regions Bank is an Equal Housing Lender and Member FDIC. Additional information about Regions and its full line of products and services can be found at www.regions.com.

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Dear HCF Supporters,

#GivingTuesday is a global day that allows individuals to support causes and organizations that make a difference in their communities and around the world. Every year, on the Tuesday after Cyber Monday, the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is pleased to join in Giving Tuesday and with the help of our support, the fight to Campaign for HBCUs will continue to assure that HCF can support the important assignment that HBCUs and MSIs do in providing quality education to a diverse population of students.

This year, our goal is to reach $50,000 in necessary funding to continue our mission to provide scholarships and support higher education. Gifts donated during HCF’s #GivingTuesday campaign will be used where needed most in support of students attending HBCUs and higher education, specifically Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Predominately Black Institutions (PBIs).

Higher education can be the debt of a student during their matriculating, and with your support of HCF, we can assist with helping those students with their educational endeavors. On Tuesday, November 30, 2021, we encourage you to consider HCF in reaching its goals to advocate for higher education, making a recurring or one-time gift below.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund
Founded in 2012, HCF was the vision and brainchild of founder Demetrius Johnson, Jr. In 2015, HCF incorporated its mission to supporting the significance and raising funds for student scholarships and services at HBCUs and MSIs. HCF remains today as a strong advocate for students and higher education. Visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

How can I join the cause? You can support HCF through its #GivingTuesday campaign in the following ways:

  • Joining the #Unselfie movement by taking a selfie with reasons why you support HCF and tagging HCF on social media using #HCFGivingTuesday
  • Use the hashtag #GivingTuesday to talk about HCF, what does the organization mean to you and why do you support the organization
  • Make a gift by using Cash App: $CampaignForHBCUs
  • Or online at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/donate and contributing to one of the following: HCF HBCU General Scholarship, Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour, The Brenda G. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund, and Campus Student Ambassador Program. You may designate where your donation goes, and 100% of it goes to the selected cause.

To get involved in supporting HCF before, on GivingTuesday, and after, you are encouraged to visit the HCF Giving Tuesday official page at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/donate/givingtuesday to learn more about how you can make a difference!

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NEW ORLEANS, LA – The Kick-off press conference for the 48th Annual Bayou Classic, presented by Procter & Gamble, featuring the historic rivalry between the Tigers of Grambling State University and the Jaguars of Southern University. The Bayou Classic is revered as the “Granddaddy” of HBCU college matchups.

Governmental leaders, tourism leaders, Bayou Classic organizers and representative from both Southern University and Grambling State University will make and provide updates on this year’s 48th Annual Bayou Classic scheduled for November 26-27.

The Bayou Classic is the annual extravaganza bringing the fans and alumni of Grambling State University and Southern University to New Orleans each November for a celebration of football, family and the traditions surrounding Historically Black College and Universities.

Other events include the Bayou Classic Parade, which will once again hit the streets of New Orleans the Saturday of Bayou Classic – Saturday, November 27. The parade starts at 9:30 am. Of note, the parade route has been changed back to its original route.

This year’s Bayou Classic parade will start on Elysian Fields at the river; N Peters Street past the French Market; down N Peters St/Decatur; turn right off N Peters St on Canal; turn left off Canal on St Charles Ave; turn right off St Charles Ave on Poydras Street; turn right off Poydras on Loyola; parade disembarks at Duncan Plaza on Loyola.

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NEW ORLEANS, LA – The Black College Football Hall of Fame announced the establishment of the HBCU Legacy Bowl Career Fair, presented by the New Orleans Saints.

The first annual HBCU Legacy Bowl Career Fair will be held February 17-18, 2022 at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans. The event will provide job opportunities and career counseling for graduating seniors from Louisiana’s four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Dillard, Grambling State, Southern and Xavier) and feature expert panels, motivational speakers and direct interaction with national and statewide corporate partners. Admission is free. In addition, eight HBCU graduating seniors will be selected as interns to gain hands-on experience during HBCU Legacy Bowl week.

“We are honored and thankful to have the support of Gayle Benson and the New Orleans Saints in this meaningful initiative to provide opportunities for HBCU students,” said Super Bowl MVP and Black College Football Hall of Fame Co-Founder Doug Williams. “Their generous, multi-year commitment will allow us to continue our work in lifting up the HBCU community.”

“We are excited about the HBCU Legacy Bowl coming to New Orleans and the opportunity to work with the Black College Football Hall of Fame to present the Career Fair,” said New Orleans and New Orleans Pelicans owner Gayle Benson. “Dillard, Grambling State, Southern and Xavier universities are responsible for educating and nurturing generations of leaders who have made Louisiana a unique vibrant and entrepreneurial community. We are eager to work with the Legacy Bowl to provide greater insights into careers in and around sports and, more importantly, create more opportunities for careers within these industries.”

About The Black College Hall of Fame
The Black College Hall of Fame was founded in 2009 by African-American Pioneers, quarterbacks James Harris and Doug Williams to preserve the history and honor the greatest football players, coaches and contributors from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). There have been 90 inductees since inception, including Mel Blount, James Harris, Willie Lanier, Art Shell and Doug Williams, who serve as Trustees.

The Black College Football Hall of Fame presented annually by The Shack Harris & Doug Williams Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, tax-exempt organization. For more information, visit www.blackcollegefootballhof.org.

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Alumnus honored during ceremony, tree-planting on Veterans Day

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. – As part of a commitment to innovation, cutting-edge programming, and academic opportunities, Stillman College’s Veterans Resources Center has launched the Lieutenant General Willie J. Williams Institute for Leadership, Education Equity, and Race Relations in America.

The Institute expounds upon the life and legacy of Stillman alumnus Willie J. Williams, one of the first three African-American Marines to wear the rank of three-star general. Williams retired in 2013 from his position as the director for Marine Corps Staff.

The William Institute is an effort to afford Stillman College and the community extensive access to scholarly research, interdisciplinary study, discourse and debate and advocacy on cutting-edge issues related to leadership, education equity, and race relations in America.

Stillman announced the Institute Thursday during its Veterans Day festivities, including a tree-planting on the quad in Williams’ honor.

“This world needs knowledgeable leader,” Williams said. “I’ve seen the best and worst of them, and those that are well-balanced in their knowledge and understanding of leadership, equity, and race – without even continuously categorizing them as such – have a much greater positive impact on their organizations.”

Stillman College alumnus Lt. Gen. Willie J. Williams was honored Thursday for his service in the Marines and to his alma mater.

Williams said his path from “extremely humble beginnings” to Stillman College “statistically should not have happened.” He credits being an active student at Stillman for helping shape him into a leader and one of the most respected voices in the U.S. military.

“I have received many awards and honors in my lifetime,” Williams said. “However, being the namesake of this endeavor supersedes them all.”

DeMarcus Hopson, dean for enrollment management and executive director of Military Student Services, leads this initiative, with senior business major Ronnie Williams, Jr. serving as student director. Hopson said the WI’s mission reflect Lt. Gen. Williams’ legacy as a cornerstone in the foundations of innovation and opportunity.

“This institute will serve as a celebrated mainstay in our region and amongst our benchmark institutions,” Hopson said. “The research and programming that have been carefully tabbed, developed and prepared will dramatically challenge the status quo and mediocrity often associated with this work and will confidently awaken a generation of global leader; this institute is revolutionary for Stillman College.”

The WI’s lectures, symposiums, brown-bag lunches, working group sessions, leadership retreats, and special program initiatives will include students, administrators, practitioners, staff members, parents, business leaders, and community partners. The WI activity heralds three unique programs in full support of its purpose and objectives.

  • The Black Male Initiative, a student development initiative focused on increasing matriculation, retention, and graduation rates for males of color
  • The 1876 Project, community engagement initiative
  • The Alabama Troops to Teachers Program, an alternative teacher certification program for veterans

These special programs will stabilize the WI’s framework and stand as the pillars of its research, programming, and partnerships. The WI will seek and attract the support of key community institutions in its work. Not only will the WI’s efforts collaborate with diverse groups of people, but it will also seek to secure cross – cultural understanding through community building, anti-racism/diversity training, conflict resolution, and educational equity initiatives.

Stillman alumnus Lt. Gen. Willie J. Williams, right, and Stillman Executive Vice President Derrick C. Gilmore shovel dirt onto a magnolia tree that was planted in Williams’ honor Thursday.

Hopson noted the approach to the WI’s work is boldly framed as a triad continuum of research, student development and civic engagement within a Ten-Point Mission:

  1. Demonstrate the counter – narrative of black males in education.
  2. Honor diverse experiences through narratives of excellence that support student success.
  3. Motivate community stakeholders to cultivate and promote positive change.
  4. Empower students to thrive academically, civically and socially.
  5. Dismantle negative stereotypes cross-culturally.
  6. Advance military and veteran student issues and contributions as well as innovative social science research and programming.
  7. Train emergent leaders prepared to excel in a global society.
  8. Foster community engagement locally and nationally.
  9. Promote student success by creating holistically supportive environments.
  10. Develop mentoring, peer connection, and student involvement opportunities through institutional and grant-funded research and student development programming.

“I am excited about the work Mr. Hopson and other will do,” Lt. Gen. Williams said. “I foresee this framework being adopted by campuses across the country and I look forward to participating and leveraging my influence to move the needle in the right direction.”

About Stillman College
Stillman College is a liberal arts institution with a historical and formal affiliation with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It is committed to fostering academic excellence, to providing opportunities for diverse populations, and to maintaining a strong tradition of preparing students for leadership and service by fostering experiential learning and community engagement designed to equip and empower Stillman’s students and its constituents. For more information, visit www.stillman.edu.

Elizabeth City State University Chancellor Karrie G. Dixon.

ELIZABETH CITY, NC Elizabeth City State University Chancellor Karrie G. Dixon has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU).

During AASCU’s Annual meeting in Clearwater, Florida this week, Chancellor Dixon was one of a number of university chancellors and presidents named to the board for this three-year appointment.

“This is a great honor to be named to the board of directors. I look forward to the work we will accomplish collectively advocating for higher education institutions in our country,” said Chancellor Dixon.

Prior to becoming ECSU’s 12th chief executive officer, Chancellor Dixon has served as a senior administrator at the UNC System Office since 2008. In 2014, she was named vice president for academic and student affairs, where she was responsible for overseeing the Division of Academic and Student Affairs for the System’s 17 institutions.

Chancellor Dixon is a recent recipient of one of North Carolina’s highest honors, The Old North State Award, for her dedication to higher education. In 2020, she was named “One of the 10 Most Dominant HBCU Leaders,” by the HBCU Campaign Fund, and appointed to the National Women in Aviation Advisory Board.

Since being named ECSU’s chancellor in 2018, she has led the push for campus-wide revitalization and renovation projects, consistent enrollment growth, numerous public and private partnerships, and successfully navigated the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The AASCU is a Washington, D.C.-based higher education association of nearly 400 public colleges, universities and systems whose members share a learning-and-teaching-centered culture, a historic commitment to underserved student populations, and a dedication to research and creativity that advances their regions’ economic progress and cultural development.

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CHICAGO, IL – The Chicago Football Classic (CFC), in collaboration with BMO Harris Bank, Walgreens, City Colleges of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, and The Links Incorporation, will host its 2nd Virtual HBCU Week on November 9-13, from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. The week-long experience will feature a financial empowerment summit, career fair, prep rally, and college fair.

The events are scheduled as follows:

Tuesday, November 9th 6:30 pm-8:30pm
Financial Empowerment Summit, Sponsored by: BMO Harris Bank

An interactive planning seminar, featuring financial experts & college advisors providing guidance to students on the basics of saving for college and discussions on fiscal responsibility

Wednesday, November 10th – Student Health & Counseling Services, Sponsored by: Walgreens

A spirited conversation about simplifying the experience of an undergraduate education, including valuable student assistance and resource programs, such: Medical Services, Counseling, Psychiatry Services, Wellness Programs and Services and Student Insurance

Thursday, November 11th – Career Fair

An exhibition of internships, post-graduation employment and career opportunities for students not planning to attend a four-year institution

Friday, November 12th – Virtual Pep Rally featuring Power 92 Radio, Sponsored by City Colleges of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, The Links Incorporation

Showcasing HBCU spirit and excitement, highlight past battle of the bands and rally events

Saturday, November 13th – College Fair, Sponsored by BMO Harris Bank

Representatives from HBCUs from across the country will be available to discuss admissions, scholarships, selecting a major and overall campus life

All virtual events will take place from 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM. The links will be provided upon registration at www.ChicagoFootballClassic.org. For additional information, visit www.ChicagoFootballClassic.org or call (773) 874-8000 X4025.

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Proposed facility would replace King, Williams dorms on Stillman Campus

Stillman College President Dr. Cynthia Warrick (right) and Elisha Rhodes, interim CEO and COO of YWCA USA, sign a MOU to collaborate on a health and wellness recreation center project on Stillman’s campus.

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. – Stillman College and YWCA USA have partnered to pursue development of a facility to provide childcare, health, and recreational services to one of Tuscaloosa’s critically underserved areas.

Representatives from both Stillman and the YWCA signed a memorandum of understanding Thursday on Stillman’s campus and will soon begin raising funds and support for the center, which will serve Stillman students and employees, as well as residents in Tuscaloosa’s West End.

Stillman College President Dr. Cynthia Warrick said there is a scarcity of accessible parks and activities for both children and seniors in the West End. The planned facility will provide education, fitness and health activities to a multi-generational West End populations.

Stillman College and the YWCA USA signed a partnership agreement Thursday, Nov. 4, 2021, that will lead to the construction of a YMCA facility on campus. The new facility will be named in honor of Vivian Malone Jones, the first Black person to graduate the University of Alabama. William Hall, right, and King Hall, former residence halls contaminated with asbestos and lead paint, are the two buildings that will be torn down and replaced by the new facility. [ Yahoo News Staff Photo/Gary Cosby Jr.]

“We need this space for both the campus and our community,” said Dr. Cynthia Warrick, president of Stillman College. “And the YWCA, which provides housing education and childcare services, is a perfect partner.”

The plan is for the center to replace both King Hall and Williams Hall, a part of dormitories no longer in use and are planned for asbestos abatement and later demolition. The Stillman Foundation recently received a Brownfields Assessment Grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to develop a cleanup plan for the structures. The Stillman Foundation will soon pursue an additional grant to perform the cleanup itself.

“The YWCA is excited to partner with Stillman College as it works to create innovative approaches that forge new ways to bring about equity and access to resources in underserved communities across the country,” said Elisha Rhodes, interim CEO and COO of YWCA USA.

“YWCA works to fight for justice, advance economic opportunity, and enable greater access to education and health care to make the communities we serve more equitable,” Rhodes said. “This partnership with Stillman College is essential to that work and will help us continues to deliver programming, services, and other resources that support our mission to eliminate racism, empower women, and promote peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all.”

Official plan to name the facility the “Vivian Malone Jones YWCA at Stillman College.” While Malone Jones is the first African-American to graduate the University of Alabama, her husband, Dr. Mack Arthur Jones, was a Stillman student who served as her personal driver during her time at UA. Malone Jones’ family credits the support from Stillman and Tuscaloosa’s West End for helping her graduate from UA, Warrick said.

The development of the Vivian Malone Jones YWCA at Stillman College will also enhance community-based programs that currently operate on Stillman’s campus, including Arts & Austism, which holds classes and activities at Stillman; and the Girls Scouts, which is headquartered at the Hay Center. Additionally, The House Tuscaloosa, a literacy initiative for children on the West End, is located in the historic president’s house on Stillman’s campus.

Warrick said Stillman students will benefit greatly from the numerous layers of engagement, which will provide opportunities to manage recreational programs, tutor and engage in STEM education activities, and connect with seniors, which ties into Stillman’s Quality Enhancement Plan to prepare students for a multi-generational workforce.

“Stillman is so central to this community – an anchor for over 100 years,” Warrick said. “We should be able to draw and enhance the services for our students, youth and seniors. We’re excited to begin this mission.”

About Stillman College
Stillman College is a liberal arts institution with a historical and formal affiliation with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It is committed to fostering academic excellence, to providing opportunities for diverse populations, and to maintaining a strong tradition of preparing students for leadership and service by fostering experiential learning and community engagement designed to equip and empower Stillman’s students and its constituents. For more information, visit www.stillman.edu.


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CHICAGO, IL – U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) announced last month $587,729 in federal funding to Chicago State University. This funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Predominantly Black Institutions Program will assist the university in implementing their Resiliency and Capacity Expansion for Student Success in the Health Professions (RECESS-HP) program. Chicago State University is Illinois’ only four-year U.S. Department of Education-designated Predominantly Black Institution.

“HCF applauds U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth and Dick Durbin for working closely together in taking the effort to ensure that underprivileged institutions in communities of color like Chicago State University have the funding it needs to continue producing academic excellence. We would also like to thank the Department of Education for its investment towards Predominantly Black Institutions through its program. We are excited for this funding, which is part of a 5-year, $2.9 million commitment to help students pursue the health sciences field and boost employment in the Illinois workforce and within the country. I commend President Scott for her continued effort in ensuring that Chicago State University remain relevant and her tireless leadership in CSU’s continued success. We look forward to observing CSU’s plans of utilizing the funds for RECESS-HP and will continue to follow up through our advocacy with the senate to keep the fight ongoing for continuous funding for PBIs like Chicago State,” said Demetrius Johnson Jr., Founder, President & CEO at HBCU Campaign Fund.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF)
The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is a nonprofit educational organization that supports the significance and raises funds for scholarship, initiative programming, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. HCF remains a strong advocate for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

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BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Commissioner Dr. Dennis E. Thomas, has been selected as the recipient of the 2021 SWAC Lifetime Achievement Award. Thomas is an alumnus of Alcorn State.

During his collegiate playing career, Thomas was a standout offensive lineman at Alcorn State where he was a two-time Pittsburgh Courier All-American (1972 and 1973), and was named SWAC Offensive Player of the Year in 1973 – the first and only offensive lineman to win the award. Thomas was a member of the Braves’ 1970 SWAC championship team, and his team, and his teams went a combined 27-8-1.

He is currently in his 20th year as Commissioner of the MEAC, following a period of nearly two decades that has seen the conference remain financially stable, strengthen institutional compliance and improve student-athlete graduation rates. In the process, he has gained the distinction as one of leading collegiate athletics administrators in America.

The steady leadership of Thomas has reassured the league’s student-athletes, coaches, staff and fans alike that their health and safety take precedence over athletics competitions, in keeping with the MEAC’s motto of “Educating Student-Athletes for the Game of Life.”

The MEAC celebrated its Golden Anniversary in 2020-21, celebrating 50 years since its founding in 1970. Under Thomas’ guidance, the conference continues to be a pacesetter even during a global pandemic.

Thomas is scheduled to be formally recognized at the 2021 SWAC Hall of Fame presented by Pepsi on Friday, December 17th at 6 p.m. CST/7 p.m. EST at the Omni Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia.

About the SWAC
The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is considered one of the premier HBCU conferences in the country and currently ranks among the elite in the nation in terms of HBCU alumni playing with professional sports teams

Current championship competition offered by the league includes competition for men in Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Football, Golf, Indoor Track and Field, Outdoor Track and Field and Tennis

Women’s competition is offered in the sports of Basketball, Bowling, Cross Country, Golf, Indoor Track and Field, Outdoor Track and Field, Soccer, Softball, Tennis and Volleyball.

MISSISSIPPI – Fall enrollment at Mississippi Public Universities remains steady when compared to Fall 2020 figures. Fall enrollment for 2021 is 76,510 for the system, compared to 77,154 students enrolled in Fall 2020, representing a .8 percent decrease.

Mississippi Public Universities member HBCUs include Jackson State UniversityAlcorn State University, and Mississippi Valley State University. At MVSU, there was a slight increase from Fall 2020, showing an increase of 1.6 percent, and President Jerryl Briggs, who was named one of the Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2021 by the HBCU Campaign Fund, said the university is trending in the right direction.

Jackson State University saw a 2.3% change in enrollment with an increase of 159 students. While, Alcorn State University saw an -4.8% change in enrollment with a decrease of 156 students, both for Fall 2021.

We are pleased with the modest increase in our fall enrollment numbers, but our priority and focus will remain on our enrollment and retention strategies. I am grateful for all the hard work that has gone into getting the university to this point in helping to keep MVSU in motion,” said Briggs.

“Our students continue to invest in themselves and their education,” said Dr. Alfred Rankin Jr., Commissioner of Mississippi Institutions of Higher Education. “The steady enrollment is a testament to their dedication, even in the face of adversities brought on by the workforce, their perseverance will benefit not only themselves but also the businesses and organization in which they work and the economy.”

Figures are unduplicated and count students one time regardless of on-campus and off-campus enrollment. Figures are based on enrollment as of November 1 of the fall term.

About the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning
The Mississippi Board of Trustees of state Institutions of Higher Learning governs the public universities of Mississippi, including Alcorn State University; Delta State University; Jackson State University; Mississippi State University including the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry and Veterinary Medicine; Mississippi University for Women; Mississippi Valley State University; the University of Mississippi including the University of Mississippi Medical Center; and the University of Southern Mississippi. For more information, visit www.mississippi.edu.

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FAIRFIELD, Ala. – Miles College has recently announced an increased in total enrollment this fall by 4%, the College’s second consecutive enrollment increase since 2019. Miles College simultaneously welcomed 519 new students this semester, a 7% increase from 2020. The incoming class boasted a 3.07 average GPA, one of the highest among all new classes to date.

The College enrolled 126 transfer students for the fall 2021-2022 academic year, an increased of 50% from the 2020 school year. The phenomenal single-year, double-digit percentage enrollment increase culminated in a final fall 2021 enrollment count of 1,501 students at Greater Birmingham’s only four-year historically black college or university (HBCU). This increase brings total enrollment above 1,500 for the first time since 2017.

Additionally, the College deplayed an aggressive campaign to engage students who had their education disrupted for various reasons. In collaboration with Regions Foundation, this campaign resulted in Miles College re-enrolling 132 students returning to Miles College after disruption of at least a year of non-continuous enrollment. A total increase of 132% from 2020.

“This is a true testament to the work that our enrollment management team is doing to have this type of growth and success for the second year in a row,” said Bobbie Knight, Miles College President. “I am extremely proud of the hard work that we are doing at Miles College to ensure that we continue to recruit, retain, and educate our amazing students.”

Miles College has focused on improving its programs and processes to ensure student success. Despite the challenges brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, Miles College was very aggressive with its recruiting tactics.

“Guided by our strategic planning efforts, we’re leading the way in Alabama and nationally in our efforts to remove barriers to provide a global, high-quality educational experience for all of our students,” said Michael A. Johnson, Vice President for Enrollment Management. “It’s been an incredibly challenging year, but we’re seeing very positive trends in key areas, from our freshman enrollment growth to our community partnerships, much like the articulation agreement signed with Lawson State Community College last spring and we look forward to continuing to leverage these partnerships to enhance opportunities for our students.”

About Miles College
Miles College, founded in 1898, is a primer liberal arts institution located in metropolitan Birmingham within the corporate limits of the City of Fairfield. The noble founders of the institution saw educated leadership as the paramount need in the black community. Miles, which is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and accredited by Commission on Colleges for the awarding of Baccalaureate Degrees, is the only four-year institution in historic Birmingham, Alabama designated as a member of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). For more information, visit www.miles.edu.

The NBA is continuing its ongoing commitment to HBCUs through three new key efforts.

NEW YORK – The NBA has announced an extension of its ongoing commitment to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) with new programs designed to create greater opportunity for students and alumni, encourage economic advancement and further celebrate their rich traditions. As part of this partnership, the NBA will develop new programs and events focused on the HBCU community – specifically around professional development, career advancement and increased support and awareness for HBCU athletics and institutions.

The NBA is committed to supporting the growth of the next generation of leaders from the Black community. HBCUs – which produce 20 percent of the country’s Black college graduates but only account for three percent of all colleges in the United States – have historically been under-resourced, averaging one-eighth the size of endowments of historically white colleges and universities. The NBA’s programming will advance educational, career and economic opportunities in collaboration with HBCU networks, and will focus on three areas:

New Fellowship Program for Career Development

  • Launching in 2022, the NBA and its teams will offer a new paid fellowship program for undergraduate and graduate students. The program, which will be led by the NBA Foundation, will offer HBCU students the opportunity to gain real-life insights and professional experience around the business and operations of basketball. The students will work in positions at the league office and NBA and WNBA teams, and be matched with a league or team employee mentor as part of their experience. Applications for the program will open on Careers.NBA.com in the coming months.

NBA HBCU Classic

  • Building off the success of NBA All-Star 2021, the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) will once again highlight the HBCU community during NBA All-Star 2022 in Cleveland
  • The celebrations will be highlighted by a Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) matchup between Howard University and Morgan State University men’s basketball teams. The game will be played at the Wolstein Center in Cleveland on February 19, 2022 and will be broadcast live.
  • During NBA All-Star, more than $1 million will be contributed in support to the HBCU community through the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF), UNCF (United Negro College Fund) and academic institutions. Additionally, HBCUs will be showcased through unique content, storytelling and special performances.

Additional Programming:

  • The NBA, G League and Basketball Africa League will leverage their pre-Draft combines and showcase events for HBCU players, coaches and athletic trainers. These engagements will increase exposure and opportunities to pursue professional basketball careers.
  • The league will expand the NBA’s targeted referee development strategy to leverage existing programs and focus on identification, training and educational opportunities for HBCU students and alumni in the officiating pipeline.
  • The NBA 2K League will host events with HBCU networks to introduce students to careers in gaming and esports, creating pathways for students to pursue careers in the growing industry.
  • HBCU alumni and Black entrepreneurs will partner with the league as part of the NBA’s commitment to onboarding more minority-owned businesses as league licensees.
  • The NBA will air special alternate game telecasts this season featuring interactive enhancements on League Pass and will work with HBCU schools to provide special experience around those select games.
  • These new efforts will bolster the league’s support of HBCUs and their students through additional scholarship programs, business case competitions, mentorship, networking and internship opportunities with partners, teams, the NBA Foundation and other members of the NBA family. Former NBA Commissioner David Stern served as a founding member of the TMCF Board of Directors for more than 30 years.

To read more, click here.

Friends and supporters are invited to help the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) continue its mission in raising the necessary funds to provide scholarships and support higher education by making a gift on #GivingTuesday, November 30. Gifts donated during HCF’s #GivingTuesday campaign will be used where needed most in support of students attending HBCUs and higher education, specifically Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Predominately Black Institutions (PBIs).

HCF is pleased to join in Giving Tuesday, a global day of giving that harnesses individuals, communities, and organizations’ collective power to encourage philanthropy and celebrate generosity worldwide. The organization’s set fundraising goal is $50,000.

“As HCF continues to strengthen its advocacy mission in support of students and higher education, our organization will keep the momentum going as among one of the leading that inspires and transform the HBCU and PBI community and assists students in reducing the financial burden on their educational goals,” said HBCU Campaign Fund’s Founder, President & CEO, Demetrius Johnson Jr. “With the help of our supporters, the fight to Campaign For HBCUs will continue to assure that HCF can support the important assignment that HBCUs and MSIs do in providing quality education to a black and diverse population of students. Our fundraising goal will provide the leverage for our organization to strengthen our philanthropy ability to overcome and continue supporting our students, higher ed institutions.”

Leading up to #GivingTuesday, donors are encouraged to join the movement by posting a #Unselfie on social media or speaking about why you support HCF as an HBCU supportive organization and using the campaign hashtag #HCFGivingDay. You can sign-up to volunteer as a Social Media Ambassador to provide HCF’s #GivingTuesday campaign and share the #GivingTuesday social media post/flyers (pictured below) on social media.

For more information, donors are welcomed to visit the HCF’s Giving Tuesday campaign page. The organization has identified four scholarship funds and initiative programs that donors can assist with in reaching its goal to continue benefiting students and our partners.

  • Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour
  • The Brenda G. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • HBCU General Scholarship Fund
  • Campus Student Ambassador Program

Higher education can be the debt of students in accomplishing their educational goals. In order to fulfill our mission at HCF and make a difference, the campaign for students, HBCUs and MSIs is vital. We ask of your support and we hope that you choose HCF as your charity of choice on #GivingTuesday, November 30th!

About HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF)
HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is a nonprofit educational organization that support the significance and raises funds for scholarship, initiative programming, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. HCF remains a strong advocates for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

About GivingTuesday
GivingTuesday is a global generosity movement unleashing the power of people and organizations to transform their communities and the world. GivingTuesday was created in 2012 as a simple idea: a day that encourages people to do good. Over the past seven years, it has grown into a global movement that inspires hundred of million people to give, collaborate, and celebrate generosity. For more information, visit www.givingtuesday.org.

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Washtenaw Community College, Jackson State University, Mississippi Valley State University and Southern University at New Orleans recently announced a partnership creating a pathway to success for students transferring associate degrees.

Announced ahead of National Transfer Student Week (Oct. 18-22), this news marks the first comprehensive agreement – with benefits such as guaranteed admission and access to in-state tuition – between a Michigan two-year school and a Historically Black College & University (HBCU).

The Washtenaw Community College HBCU Pathway program creates opportunities for student success and transfer equity by providing a clear, direct, affordable and supportive pathway for community college students to attend HBCUs.

In addition to guaranteeing admission to Jackson State (JSU), Mississippi Valle State (MVSU) and Southern University at New Orleans (SUNO) for WCC students who successfully complete requirements, the partnership opens access to in-state tuition and scholarships and waives application fees.

Transfer agreements between WCC and other HBCUs will soon be announced.

Representatives from JSU, MVSU and SUNO will discuss a partnership and transfer information during a panel session hosted by WCC during National Transfer Week. Current and prospective WCC students and families, as well as members of the community, are invited to register to attend the virtual session from 6-7:30 p.m. (EST) on Wednesday, Oct. 20.

WCC President Dr. Rose B. Bellance

“Creating a pipeline for students success is essential to our mission, and it starts with access, nurturing students with big dreams and helping them realize the opportunities to further their education,” said WCC President Dr. Rose B. Bellance.

“Our new HBCU pathway is designed to support students from high school through community college and then through completion of their bachelor’s degree. We are excited to announce our first HBCU partnerships with Jackson State, Mississippi Valley State and Southern University in New Orleans.”

The three HBCUs are rich in history with an extensive offering of undergraduate and graduate programs, including those Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Jackson State University President Thomas K. Hudson, J.D.

“Our new partnership with Wastenaw Community College will ensure that deserving students have a solid pathway to continue their education in a caring, encouraging environment that will enhance their skills in their chosen field of interest,” said JSU President Thomas K. Hudson, J.D.

“I look forward to watching these students matriculate to obtain their bachelor’s degrees and beyond.”

Located in Jackson, Miss., Jackson State University was originally founded in 1877 as a seminary and today has grown into a comprehensive urban research university offering a wide range of undergraduate and graduate programs, including at the doctorate level.

MVSU President Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Sr.

“We here at MVSU are so excited to join in partnership with Washtenaw Community College,” said MVSU President Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Sr. “Having a pathway for students to transfer seamlessly between our institutions shows our mutual commitment to student success and further supports the importance of higher education achievement. We look forward to starting and building on this tremendous opportunity.”

Located in Itta Bena, Miss., Mississippi Valley State University held its first classes in 1950, originally to train rural and elementary teachers and to provide vocational education. It now offers comprehensive undergraduate and graduate programs in education, the arts and sciences, and professional studies.

SUNO Executive Vice President-Chancellor Dr. James H. Ammons, Jr.

“We are excited to partner with Washtenaw Community College and also pleased to be one of the three HBCUs to create opportunities for student success,” said Dr. James H. Ammons, Jr., SUNO Executive Vice President-Chancellor. “This is also a great way for Southern University at New Orleans to expand its footprint in the Michigan region. Students will have an impeccable transfer experience from WCC to SUNO to enroll in our undergraduate degree programs and also matriculate to our graduate programs.”

Located in New Orleans, SUNO was founded as a branch unit of Southern University and Agricultural & Mechanical College in Baton Rouge in 1956 and offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the arts and sciences, business and public administration, education and human development and social work.

One of the benefits of the new HBCU transfer pipeline is that it offers an attractive return on investment for college students and families. With a $2,280 average annual full-time in-district tuition, WCC already provides an affordable start to a college education.

“This is the perfect opportunity for me. Having the close-knit community and support services that both WCC and HBCUs offers for biology majors like myself is very important,” said current WCC student Alexia Easley, an Ypsilanti resident and Ann Arbor Pioneer High School graduate. “I’m excited because I know HBCUs provide such a phenomenal impact on STEM students.”

DeVaughn Swanson knows the value of great opportunities an HBCU education provides. The former WCC student transferred to Morehouse College in Atlanta in 2008. He graduated from Morehouse in 2012 and is now a Detroit attorney and Ypsilanti pastor.

“WCC prepared me for Morehouse College by offering rigorous courses and practical student leadership opportunities. I think this partnership is a dynamic idea and further proves that WCC is committed to ensuring the future success of all WCC students,” Swanson said. “This partnership gives students interested in HBCUs something to look forward to and work toward. A person who has been educated at WCC and an HBCU is destined to make a positive impact on the world.”

WCC’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion led development of the alliance to provide additional pathways to success for the college’s diverse student population and is planning high school outreach events to highlight the new HBCU agreements as well as programming and support for WCC students planning to transfer to an HBCU partner.

For more information, email diversity@wccnet.edu.

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BATON ROUGE, LA – Southern University and A&M College continues to enjoy significant enrollment growth that now spans over the past five years. For the fall 2021 semester, a preliminary total of 7,404 students are currently enrolled at the flagship campus of the Southern University System. This is an overall increase of seven percent from the fall semester of 2020 and a particularly noteworthy 17 percent increase in the number of the first-time freshmen currently attending the institution. These number include both undergraduate and graduate students.

This steady increase in enrollment is an obvious testament that Southern University continues to stand as a premier institution of higher learning,” said Ray L. Benton, president-chancellor of the Southern University System and chancellor of Southern University and A&M College. “It is also a testament that students look to Southern to create and continue legacies that positively impact their families and communities.”

While Southern continues to have a majority enrollment of Black students, enrollment has also increased from fall 2020 among several other racial and ethnic groups. This includes an 75 percent increase in students of Asian descent, a 25 percent increase in students of Native American or Alaskan Indian descent, and a 15 percent increase in student of Hispanic descent.

Student come from 40 states in the U.S., including Louisiana, with 63 parishes represented. Nearly 30 countries are also represented in this fall class. With the given enrollment growth, Southern is well-positioned for target goal attainment as indicated in the campus strategic plan.

Southern was recently named among the top 20 Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. The university is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral degrees.

About Southern University and A&M College
The mission of Southern University and A&M College, an Historically Black, 1890 land-grant institution, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is to provide a student-focused teaching and learning environment that creates global leadership opportunities for a diverse student population where teaching, research, service, scholarly and creative expectation for students and faculty are achieved through the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs offered at the institution via different instructional modalities and via public service. For more information, visit www.subr.edu.

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Chicago State University’s entrance sign.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) announced $587,729 in federal funding to Chicago State University. The funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Predominately Black Institutions Program will assist the university in implementing their Resiliency and Capacity Expansion for Student Success in the Health Professions (RECESS-HP) Program. Chicago State, located on Chicago’s South Side, is Illinois’ only four-year U.S. Department of Education-designated Predominately Black Institution.

“Those of us who weren’t always sure we’d be able to go to college or faced barriers upon entry understand the power of a diploma,” said Duckworth. “I’ll keep working with Senator Durbin to ensure federal support for higher education, especially for Illinois schools like Chicago State University and for working class communities and communities of color, so that every American has the opportunity to enroll in college and complete a degree.”

“Higher education should be accessible to every American, no matter who they are or where they live. Today’s federal funding will help recruit and enroll students at Chicago State University to study health and science at an affordable cost. I will continue to work with Senator Duckworth to secure these kind of investments in communities of color and Predominately Black Institutions,” said Durbin.

“This funding, part of a 5-year, $2.9 million commitment, will help ensure Chicago State University’s continued excellence in the health sciences, where our graduate experience 100 percent job placement. Health sciences in an area of growth in the Illinois workforce, and we know that increasing access into the healthcare workforce for communities of color is key to addressing health inequities, so we will continue our innovative student success strategies with this federal funding,” said Chicago State University President Zaldwaynaka “Z” Scott, Esq.

Through RECESS-HP, Chicago State plans to prioritize outreach to Black men, develop programs in health education and sciences and improve and expand hybrid and remote learning for students at the university. The U.S. Department of Education’s Predominately Black Institutions Program awards grant to eligible colleges to make higher education more accessible for low-and middle income Black students.

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Mr. Hill helping United Way distribute food to be needy.

TALLADEGA, AL – Seddrick Hill Sr. , who previously served as vice president for institutional advancement at Talladega College, is the first African American ever selected to serve as Talladega, Alabama’s city manager. The fact that Mr. Hill was unanimously chosen by Talladega City’s Council for the city’s highest-ranking post, overseeing close to 300 employees, including Talladega fire fighters and police, suggests that a seismic shift may be underway in Dega.

Some people who didn’t necessary envision or desire a city manager who looked like me seem to be excited about the changes I’m trying to bring to the city,” said Hill, who earned a bachelor’s degree in public administration with a minor in criminal justice from Talladega; a master’s in public administration with a concentration in criminal justice from Jacksonville State University; and a certificate in philanthropy and fundraising at the New York University (NYU) George H. Heyman, Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising.

“One of my chief priorities is to restore a sense of pride in our community,” said Hill. “Everybody didn’t celebrate my appointment, but most people want what’s best for our city. So as they see the changes I’m trying to make, even some of the naysayers have begun to ask me how they can help me make Talladega a better place to live and work.”

These changes including fighting crime by adding LED lighting to brighten dangerous areas; installing ShotSpotters to alert police when a gun is fired; establishing a partnership with Crime Stoppers; increasing police training; and getting more officers into the community and engaging with young people in order to build trust and better serve Talladegans.

Mr. Hill has also undertaken an epic battle against blight. While the city has an array of impressive resources, including Talladega Superspeedway, Talladega College, the Alabama Institute the for the Deaf and Blind (AIDB), the International Motorsports Hall of Fame, Historic Silk Stocking District, Hall of Heroes, CMP Talladega Marksmanship Park, Heritage Hall, Historic Ritz Theatre, TOP Trails, Davey Allison Park and the William R. Harvey Museum of Art, which houses the Amistad Murals, many areas are in need of a facelift. A number of neglected homes, some inherited by individuals who reside in other states, have detracted from Talladega’s beauty.

To remedy this program, Hill drives through the community extensively, actively seeking ways to better maintain and improve Talladega. He is working aggressively to strengthen the city’s code enforcement department while also working closely with the Talladega City Council to remove some abandoned homes at no charge to homeowners via development block grants. His strategies including meeting with negligent landlords and insisting that they maintain the properties they own or risk losing their business licenses; encouraging tenants to take pride in their communities via contests and special promotions; securing more workers and new equipment to better maintain outdoor spaces; and more proactively seeking grants to help beautify Talladega.

After surveying Talladega citizens, Hill discovered that over ninety percent felt there were not enough free or affordable activities for children and families. To remedy this program, he recently hosted Talladega’s first-ever Community and Employee Appreciation Day. Highlights included a picnic, pedal boats, golf, fishing, waterslides and swimming at Shocco Springs, a large conference center in Talladega. The free outdoor event was attended by hundreds.

While Hill is a native of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, he is thoroughly at home in Talladega. In addition to graduating from and working for Talladega College, he was most recently employed by AIDB, where he was the first African American to serve as the organization’s executive director of institutional advancement and community relations.

“Talladega is blessed to have beautiful outdoor spaces where residents and visitors can socialize, bond and have a great time. After seeing how much everyone enjoyed our first Community and Employee Appreciation Day, I am determined to make this a tradition. It’s good for families and good for the entire community,” Hill stated.

“Living in a safe, clean, attractive community where the grass is mowed, potholes are filled, streets are cleaned, and properties are well-maintain is critical to the mental and physical wellbeing of our residents,” said Hill, who believes that revitalizing the city will help attract more businesses and create greater opportunities for its citizens.

A number of community leaders have expressed excitement about Mr. Hill’s initiatives.

Talladega City School Superintendent Dr. Quentin Lee stated, “Mr. Hill has an eye for discovering the beauty in all things Talladega. In my many conversations with him, he is always thinking towards the future and finding ways to provide more for the citizens of Talladega. Mr. Hill has a heart for the students in Talladega. His commitment to helping children succeed is key in moving our city forward. Mr. Hill is always eager to help assist the students and schools in Talladega. He’s a welcomed change agent in our community. His plans will definitely benefit the next generations to come.”

Dr. John Mascia, president and CEO of Alabama Institute for the Dear and Blind, one of the largest institutions in Talladega, stated, “Mr. Hill is accessible and he is truly interested in getting to know people in this community. He is naturally carious to learn about what other people are thinking and his style of developing events that bring a cross section of the community together is the gift that Seddrick Hill brings to the city of Talladega, Alabama in his role as city manager.”

Talladega College Acting President Dr. Lisa Long stated, “I am so pleased that Mr. Hill has taken this opportunity to build community relationships and partnerships.”

Talladaga Mayor Timothy Ragland added, “Mr. Hill has a record of getting things done and he brings that experience to City Hall. I am excited to work with Mr. Hill on critical initiatives and policies to expand smart growth and development while maintaining the community’s identity.”

Hall of Heroes Museum Curator Jimmy Williams, stated, “My support for Seddrick Hill is based on his passion and vision for Talladega long before he became our City Manager. Even though both of his prior positions, Talladega College and AIDB, were very demanding, he still took time to support anyone trying to make our city a better place. If he tell you he is going to do something, it happens. If he teels you he can’t, he will tell you why. I have every confidence that with support he will make this city a place we will all be proud to call home.”

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The Baltimore Ravens will honor former longtime general manager and Hall of Famer Ozzie Newsome by making a $4 million gift in his name to Maryland’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

The donation from Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and his wife, Renee, will create the Ozzie Newsome Scholars Program, which will fund scholarships for Baltimore City Public Schools graduates who attend an HBCU in Maryland.

“The brilliance of Ozzie Newsome extends far beyond his accolades as a player and executive,” said Bisciotti in a statement. “Throughout his entire life, Ozzie has inspired and uplifted everyone around him with his leadership, humility and determination. We hope that Ozzie’s example will inspire each of the Newsome scholars.”

Each of Maryland’s four HBCUs — Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore — will receive a $1 million gift as part of the program. Yearly, each of the four schools will select five City Schools’ graduates as Ozzie Newsome Scholar recipients for its incoming freshman class.

Ozzie Newsome

“I am humbled and honored that Steve and Renee Bisciotti chose to associate my name with this tremendously important scholarship,” said Newsome in a statement. “This program will give many local graduates the ability to continue their education, and in turn will equip them with the necessary tools to make meaningful impact in the Baltimore community and beyond. Thee students will further their education through Maryland’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which is especially meaningful to me. I look forward to watching the progress made through this scholarship program.”

Scholars will receive an annual college scholarship of $10,000 for up to five years of college, for a total investment of up to $50,000 per scholar.

“We embrace the responsibility of discovering ways to strengthen educational opportunities for the youth of Baltimore City,” stated Bisciotti. “Any positive impact that can be made to help students – especially in the pursuit of a college education and their career goals – only strengthens our community as a whole. The Ozzie Newsome Scholars Program has the added benefit of providing scholarships funds for Maryland’s four HBCUs, which have served Maryland and Baltimore City so well for many years.”

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ST. LOUIS, MO – Dr. Corey Bradford, Sr. has announced that he is leaving Harris-Stowe State University (HSSU) to pursue an opportunity at a research university, the HSSU Board of Regents thanks Dr. Bradford for his leadership. Bradford took over as president in May 2020, replacing Dr. Dwaun Warmack, who left to for an opportunity of president at Claflin University. Bradford’s inauguration ceremony, postponed by the pandemic, was held on April 9, 2021.

Dr. Corey Bradford, Sr.

The university has announced that Dr. LaTonia Collins Smith, currently Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, will serve as Interim President, effective June 1, 2021. Collins Smith has more than 20 years of progressive leadership experience with an extensive background in administration and program development. She began her career in higher education at Harris-Stowe State University in 2010 as a project coordinator in the Office of Counseling Services. She has also served the institution as associate provost, assistant provost and as executive director of Center for Career Engagement.

Dr. Collins Smith is the co-principal investigator of a $5 million National Science Foundation grant to substantially strengthen STEM in the state of Missouri, the largest grant in the history of Harris-Stowe. She currently serves as a peer reviewer for the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the nation’s largest regional accreditation body. She also served as the campus team lead for the following initiatives; the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Re-Imagine First Year Project, the Strada Foundation Measuring College Value project, the Complete College America MSI Initiative, the Ascendium Project Success Initiative and the Gallup Alumni Survey Project.

Dr. LaTonia Collins Smith

Dr. Collins Smith serves as chair of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Statewide Celebration Commission of Missouri and a member of the Downtown Advisory Board for Greater St. Louis, Inc. She served on both the Alumni Board of Directors and Alumni Foundation Board of the University of Central Missouri. She is a member of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Dr. Collins Smith has received several leadership and service awards including the Equal Education Opportunity Group Pioneer Award, the NAACP Ben Hooks Community Leader award and the AKA Central Region’s Outstanding Educational Advancement Foundation Captain award. She is a 2019 Millennium Leadership Initiative Protégé, a St. Louis Business Diversity Initiative Fellow and a Higher Education Leadership Foundation Fellow.

Collins Smith earned a educational doctorate in higher education leadership from Maryville University in St. Louis. She holds a master of social work degree and a master of public health from Saint Louis University. She is a graduate of the University of Central Missouri, where she majored in social work.

Chair of the Board of Regents Ron Norwood commented that “Dr. Collins Smith has a proven record of outstanding leadership and will serve the University well.”

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BOWIE, MD – A new endowed cybersecurity chair position will be established at Bowie State University to accelerate the institution’s efforts to support students and graduates equipped generate new innovation in the profession, thanks to $500,000 in matching funds from the Maryland Department of Commerce.

Through the Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative Fund, a state program for STEM research at colleges and universities, Bowie State University will establish an endowed chair of cybersecurity, who will serve as the director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies in the Department of Computer Science.

“Bowie State University is grateful for the Maryland E-Nnovation award that will help enable us to launch the first endowed chair position in the history of this institution,” said Guy-Alain Amoussou, Associate Provost. “Cybersecurity and Entrepreneurship represent two areas of strength at Bowie State University, and the creation of this endowed chair position will contribute to build a pipeline of cyber entrepreneurs who will contribute to the economic development of the region.”

The initiative will create a Bowie State ecosystem of cyber innovators, infuse entrepreneurship and technology in STEM curriculum, and enhance Bowie State’s pipeline of students from traditionally underrepresented communities to become cybersecurity and entrepreneurship leaders.

“The past year has shown us time and time again why innovative thinking and creative new ideas are essential to Maryland’s economic prosperity. We can never be sure what obstacles life will throw in our path,” said Kelly M. Schulz, Maryland Commerce Secretary. “By supporting these professorships, Commerce is helping make sure that some of the sharpest minds in Maryland continue their important work.”

The Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative was created by the General Assembly during the 2014 legislative session and has provided more than $54.3 million in funding to leverage more than $60.6 million in private donations.

About Bowie State University
Bowie State University (BSU) is an important higher education access portal for qualified persons from diverse academic and socioeconomic backgrounds, seeking a high-quality and affordable public comprehensive university. The university places special emphasis on the science, technology, cybersecurity, teacher education, business, and nursing disciplines within the context of a liberal arts education. For more information about BSU, visit bowiestate.edu.

About Maryland Commerce
The Maryland Department of Commerce stimulates private investment and creates jobs by attracting new businesses, encouraging the expansion and retention of existing companies, and providing financial assistance to Maryland companies. The Department promotes the State’s many economic advantages and markets local products and services at home and abroad to spur economic development and international investment, trade and tourism. Because they are major economic generators, the Department also supports the Arts, film production, sports and other special events. For more information, visit commerce.maryland.gov.

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HOUSTON, TX – The Texas Southern University (TSU) Board of Regents named Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young as the sole finalist for the position of President of Texas Southern University.

Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young

A confirmation vote by the Regents will occur at the next board meeting on June 17, 2021. The transition team will be lead by Regent Stephanie Nellons-Paige and Interim President Kenneth Huewitt.

“Dr. Crumpton-Young is an experienced University leader and tireless advocate for students. Her impeccable credentials made her standout among the candidates. She brings with her an exciting and bold vision for Texas Southern University that aligns with the goals set forth by the Board of Regents,” said Albert H. Myres, Sr., TSU Board of Regents Chairman.

Myres thanked the Presidential Search Committee, chaired by Regent Marc Carter, who narrowed the list of candidates for president to three finalists who were invited to Houston for interviews. Crumpton-Young will replace TSU Interim President Kenneth Huewitt, who has served in the role since April 2020.

I’m honored to be considered by the full Texas Southern University Board of Regents as the sole finalist for the next president,” said Crumpton-Young. “TSU is a vibrant and treasured institution filled with legacy, excellence and promise. It will be an honor and privilege to serve.”

Crumpton-Young has served as Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Chief Academic Officer at Morgan State University since 2019. Previously, she served at Tennessee State University in several roles including, Vice President for Research and Institutional Advancement and Chief Research Officer and Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs for Research and Sponsored Programs and Chief Research Officer. Prior to her role at Tennessee State University, she served an Associate Provost of Undergraduate Studies at Texas A&M University, Program Director in the Education and Human Resource Directorate of the National Science Foundation and Associate Dean of Engineering at Mississippi State University.

In those roles, she initiated new hiring strategies to diversify University faculty and garnered seven-figure monetary gifts to fund student scholarships, research, and support Diversity Equity and Inclusion as well as student and faulty success. She received her Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering, Master of Science in Industrial Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from Texas A&M University. In addition, Crumpton-Young holds a Master of Business Administration from Tennessee State University.

About Texas Southern University
Texas Southern University is a student-centered comprehensive doctoral university committed to ensuring equality, offering innovative programs that are responsive to its urban setting, and transforming diverse students into lifelong learners, engaged citizens, and creative leaders in their local, national, and global communities. For more information, visit www.tsu.edu.

2019 Southern Heritage Classic at Liberty Bowl Stadium in Memphis, TN. Photo Creds: Division of Strategic Communications and Media Relations / HBCU Campaign Fund.

CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF), non-profit advocacy, educational organization, announces today that representatives’ will hit the road this fall once again for its 5th Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour in support of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) football classics. The tour will be joined by its Division of College Recruitment and Scholarships on specific dates to recruit students to HBCUs. The Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour is the organization’s largest initiative program.

Last year, the tour was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic that paused outside events due to a health scare and rising numbers of cases/deaths. The previous year, the tour made stops at the Southern Heritage Classic College and Career Fair and football gameChicago Football Classic College Fair and football gameCircle City Classic college fair and football gamethe University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff’s homecoming football game, and the Bayou Classic. This year, the tour will add the Fountain City Classic game (Albany State vs. Fort Valley State) in Columbus, GA. The Division of College Recruitment and Scholarships joins the SHC and CFC college fairs tour to provide students with imperative information about attending college and the HBCU experience/campus life.

“We are so pleased to return to normalcy and finally receive the opportunity to enjoy HBCU football again traditionally. We cannot wait to get back on the field sidelines to cover some HBCU football, recruit for HBCUs and enjoy our supporters never like before,” said Demetrius Johnson Jr., Founder, President & CEO at HBCU Campaign Fund. “We look forward to when planning season comes around for the tour and when it begins to enjoy our outreach efforts in telling the story of our nation HBCUs and MSIs. This initiative is an important part in pushing our advocacy mission forward.”

A representative of the Division of College Recruitment and Scholarships at HBCU Campaign Fund speaking with students at the 2018 Chicago Football Classic College Fair in Chicago, IL.

The Division of College Recruitment and Scholarships was established to partner and recruit prospective students to HBCUs and MSIs. Representatives are assigned to mentor and encourage students to choose the right HBCU that fits their educational needs. The division has also established their signature “College Bound Guide Folders,” which provide students with information such as college tips, scholarship information, in-kind HBCU recruitment materials – brochures and flyers, and career planning information.

“We look forward to getting back out to meet with students in encouraging them to choose HBCU; that is our mission and goal at HCF. We also hope to continue to inspire and meet other members of our HBCU community as well as supporters who follow the work of our organization,” Demetrius added. “We hope this tour continues to bring empowerment and awareness to our HBCUs while making sure that the name of those institutions is known to the unknown.”

The 2021 confirmed dates are as follows below.

  • Sat., Sept. 10-11: Southern Heritage Classic College/Career Fair and Football Game / Memphis, TN
  • Sat., Oct. 30: Magic City Classic Football Game / Birmingham, AL
  • Sat., Nov. 6: Fountain City Classic Football Game / Columbus, GA
  • Sat., Nov. 26: Bayou Classic Football Game / New Orleans, LA

More dates are still to be confirmed. All dates are subject to cancellation and may not be rescheduled.

If you would like to donate to support HCF’s continued advocacy work and the Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour, you may visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org/donate or text “CAMPAIGNFORHBCUS” to 1-844-701-5181. Cash App is also an option using our Cashtag $CampaignForHBCU.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund
The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded in 2012 and is a non-profit educational organization that remains a strong advocate for students and higher education. The mission of HCF is to support the significance and raise funds for scholarships, programs, and for private and public HBCUs and MSIs. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

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PINE BLUFF, AR – The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) has announced today that Chris Robinson, Interim Director of Athletics, has been appointed as Athletics Director effective immediately. Robinson has served as Interim Director of the Athletics Department since Chris Peterson retired in February.

Chirs Robinson, Director of Athletics.

Since moving to the Athletics Department at UAPB, AD Robinson has had success working to improve all facets of the operation for the benefits of the student athletes. In addition to earning the very strong endorsement of the AD Search Committee, he also enjoys the widespread enthusiastic support of the staff, the alumni and key stakeholders.

Prior to serving as Interim Athletics Director, Robinson served as Executive Associate Athletics Directors. Prior to moving to athletics department administration in January 2020, Robinson served for 8 years as director of the Office of Recruitment.

When he rejoined the UAPB Athletics Department, he returned to the place where he enjoyed success as a football player and coach for the Golden Lions. After playing for the legendary Archie “The Gunslinger” Cooley, he transferred to Southern University, playing quarterback for one season. As the UAPB football program returned to play in 1993, he returned to lead the Golden Lions to the 1994 NAIA National Championship Game, highlighted by a seven-touchdown (six passing / one rushing) performance in a come-from-behind overtime semifinal win.

Before returning to UAPB as an assistant coach, he coached quarterbacks and running backs at Mid-American Nazarene University. While also serving as assistant softball coach, and as the school’s Director of Minority Affairs.

A 2014 UAPB Sports Hall of Fame inductee, he earned his bachelor’s degree in management from UAPB, and a master’s degree in business administration from Mid-America Nazarene University.

“On behalf of UAPB, we appreciate the continued support of our students, employees, alumni, and friends as we strive to reach our ultimate goal of achieving success in both athletics and scholarships,” said Dr. Laurence B. Alexander, UAPB Chancellor. “Please join me in congratulating Robinson on his appointment as Director of Athletics. Go Lions!”

About the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB)
The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) is an 1890 Land-Grant HBCU with a diverse student population, competitive degree offerings, and stellar faculty. For more than 140 years, UAPB has worked to create an environment that emphasizes learning, growth, and productivity while affording a basic need to its students: a chance to advance. UAPB offers certificate and associate degree programs, more than 40 undergraduate and master’s degree programs, and a doctoral program in Aquaculture/Fisheries. Students are active in more than 100 organizations, including an internationally renowned Vesper Choir, Marching Musical Machine of the Mid-South Band, concert bands, wind symphony, and an accomplished athletics program. For more information, visit www.uapb.edu.

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Campus of Voorhees College. Photo Creds: Division of Strategic Communications and Media Relations/HBCU Campaign Fund.

DENMARK, SC Voorhees College announces that next April during its 125th Anniversary (quasquicentennial) Founders’ Week, the institution will change its name from Voorhees College to Voorhees University after the Board of Trustees approved the action at its annual spring meeting.

Upon approval from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, Voorhees will soon be offering its first master’s degree program where graduate students can earn a master of education in improvement science. Also, the institution is introducing the School of Graduate Studies, Continuing Education, and Integrative Learning, where the program will be housed.

David Miller, chairman of the Board of Trustees, said Voorhees founder Elizabeth Evelyn Wright fought to change the world by providing educational opportunities to African American students back when learning was scarce.

“Her legacy is solid and as we prepare for 125 years, we want to honor her and highlight the progression the institution has made,” said Miller. “We are launching our first master’s degree and establishing a variety of development centers right here on campus. I could just imagine how proud she would be if she was here today to see the transformation after beginning in 1897.”

Interim president Dr. Ronnie Hopkins said the name change signifies the new beginning and the direction the institution is going in. “This is a critical yet exciting time for Voorhees as we make this significant transition towards our next level of excellence,” said Hopkins. “We are beyond excited to welcome graduate students to our first program while we make strides to build upon the School of Graduate Studies, Continuing Education, and Integrative Learning.”

The official launch of the name change will occur during the 125th Founders’ Week Celebration happening April 2022. More details to follow.

About Voorhees College
Voorhees College is a private historically black liberal arts institution affiliated with the Episcopal church, whose mission is to produce highly qualified graduates who coalesce intellect and faith in pursuit of life-long learning, healthy living, the betterment of society, and an abiding faith in God. For more information, visit www.voorhees.edu.

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BIRMINGHAM, AL – The Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail will reopen the Montgomery Interpretive Center (MIC) located on the campus of Alabama State University starting on Friday, May 28, with a reduced number of visitors being allowed inside it at one time. Its new hours of operation, as announced by the National Park Service (NPS) that oversees its day-to-day operation, will be each on Fridays and Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The center will open in accordance with the University’s protocols regarding health and safety.

“While we are excited about the opportunity for visitors to be able to benefit from the historical displays and information housed in the Interpretive Center, we are committed to maintaining a healthy campus,” said Dr. Quinton T. Ross, Jr., ASU President. “I want to emphasize that ASU is still a mask-mandatory campus and all visitors, employees and students are required to wear masks in public spaces. Visitors should also follow CDC guidelines regarding social distancing while inside the Center and on our campus at ASU.”

ABOUT THE NPS MONTGOMERY INTERPRETIVE CENTER LOCATED AT ASU

The $5 million NPS Interpretive Center for Montgomery, located on ASU’s campus, honors the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March and the heroes, martyrs and foot-soldiers who made voting rights history happen. Center exhibits tell the story for the voting rights march led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., John Lewis and F.D. Reese with a focus on the roles of the residents of the city of Montgomery and ASU when the march reached Alabama’s capital city on March 25, 1965. It is the third and final center on the National Historic Trail, established by Congress in 1996, which additionally includes the Selma and Lowndes County Interpretive Centers.

The Montgomery Interpretive Center is located in front of The ASU Stadium, which is a short walk from the one-time home of civil rights leader Ralph David Abernathy and from the church parsonage that housed Dr. King and his family.

King and tens of thousands of men and women marched from Selma to Montgomery in 1965 to champion voting rights for Alabama and the nation’s African-American citizens. The March also served to remind the nation of the murder of Jimmy Lee Jackson in Marion, Alabama in Feb. 1965 at the hands of Alabama State Trooper James B. Fowler; whose death served as the catalyst for the March and ultimately the enactment by the U.S. Congress of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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TALLADEGA COLLEGETalladega College announced that its president and chief executive officer, Dr. Billy C. Hawkins, will retire effective June 30, 2022. When Dr. Hawkins took the helm at Talladega in 2008, the institution was struggling to survive and had under 300 students.

Dr. Billy C. Hawkins, president of Talladega College.

He implemented rigorous plans for renovation and growth that resulted in a total transformation of the college. He had one of Talladega’s most prized possessions, Hall Woodruff’s acclaimed Amistad Murals, removed from the walls of Savery Library, where they had hung for almost 70 years, and appraised. They were valued at $40 millions, but in danger of disintegrating. With the assistance of the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, GA, the murals were restored and sent on a three-year, eight city tour. The value of this historic collection soared to $50 million.

As a result of Dr. Hawkin’s vision, enrollment doubled to 601 students in one semester. He stabilized finances; increased fundraising; restarted athletics; reopened historic Swayne Hall; expanded academic offerings; restarted athletic programs; beautified the campus; initiated a robust building campaign; and successfully guided the institution through SACSCOC accreditation in 2009 and 2019.

The college ha enjoyed record high enrollment increases every academic year since 2018, and all previous enrollment records were shattered during the 2020-2021 academic year, when enrollment soared at an all-time high of over 1300 students.

Between January 2019 and January 2020, the college held ribbon-cutting ceremonies for three new facilities – a new residence hall; the Dr. William R. Harvey Museum of Art, which houses the Amistad Murals; and the Dr. Billy C. Hawkins Student Activity Center. To construct the museum for Woodruff’s murals, Dr. Hawkins secured Talladega’s largest-ever financial gift, a one million dollar donation from alumnus Dr. Williams R. Harvey. Dr. Hawkins also secured a 1.5 million dollar contribution from Alabama Governor Kay Ivey and the state of Alabama. The Talladega College Board of Trustees voted to name the new student center in honor of Dr. Hawkins in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to the institution.

Under Dr. Hawkins’s leadership, Talladega recently launched its first-ever graduate program, an online Master of Science in Computer Information Systems (MSCIS); built an acclaimed 400 member marching band; took 23 students on all-expenses-paid tour of Japan via Kakehashi Project Study Tour; won at least 17 athletic championships; and celebrated the return of Hale Woodruff’s critically acclaimed Amistad Murals to the campus.

Talladega’s 2019 SACSCOC (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges) accreditation was reaffirmed through 2029 with no recommendations for change in any of the standard reviewed and, for the first time ever, the college gained accreditation to teach at the master’s degree level.

As a result of the transformation he brought to Talladega, Dr. Hawkins has become widely known as “the turnaround expert.” He serves as chair of the 37 presidents of member institutions for the UNCF (United Negro College Fund) board of directors, and also serves as UNCF chair of the executive committee of member institutions, vice chair of the corporate board, and vice chair of the corporate board executive committee. He was appointed to the White House Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities in September, 2018. In addition, he was appointed by Alabama Governor Kay Ivey to serve on the Alabama Opioid Overdose and Addiction Council. Dr. Hawkins was the first African American to chair the Alabama Association of Independent Colleges and Universities. He is the author of two books, and a member of the Talladega Rotary Club, the Delta Upsilon Boule and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. He was ranked first place among the Top Ten Most Dominant HBCU Leaders of 2020 by HBCU Campaign Fund.

About Talladega College
Talladega College, Alabamaa’s first private historically black college, is consistently ranked among the bet southeastern colleges and top HBCUs in the nation. It was founded in 1867 by two former slaves, William Savery and Thomas Tarrant, and is the home of the renowned Hale Woodruff Amistad Murals. For more information, visit www.talladega.edu.

Dr. Edward Ofori, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chicago State University (CSU) College of Pharmacy.

CHICAGO, ILDr. Edward Ofori, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chicago State University (CSU) College of Pharmacy, was named the Illinois State Higher Education Leader, one of 35 higher education professionals chosen for the 2021 Millennium Leadership Initiative by The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). Leaders will join the AASCU’s 2021 Emerging Leaders Program (ELP), which supports higher education leaders in advancing their leadership skills. Dr. Ofori was chosen through a rigorous selection process administrated by a selection committee composed exclusively of presidents and chancellors.

Experience in ELP allows participants to determine where they fit in the academy and to envision what their career path might look like, including a concrete next step. Participants graduate with the skills, connections, and support necessary to navigate the transition to administrative roles and gain a national network of motivated peers. Additionally, ELP provides the opportunity for participants to assess their leadership style and strengths and apply the skills learned in the instructional portion of the program to a project/initiative on their home campus over the academic year.

“I am excited to join the Emerging Leaders Program this year as a higher education leader,” said Dr. Edward Ofori, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chicago State University College of Pharmacy.

Participants will learn from experiences AASCU presidents, senior leaders, and national experts in leadership and student success. Sessions will include theoretical knowledge, practical application, and case study discussions. Leaders will work with their president/chancellor or cabinet-level administrator to identify and lead a project or initiative. The campus leader will provide mentorship and guidance throughout the project/initiative. It will feature one faculty-led webinar per month from April-November 2021 and include smaller group sessions for reflection, networking, and case studies.

The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) is a Washington, D.C. -based higher education association of nearly 400 public colleges, universities, and systems. Members share a learning and teaching-centered culture, a historic commitment to underserved student populations, and a dedication to research and creativity that advances their regions’ economic progress and cultural development. These are institutions Delivering America’s Promise.

About Chicago State University (CSU)
Chicago State University (CSU) is a public, comprehensive university that provides access to higher education for students to diverse backgrounds and educational needs. The university fosters the intellectual development and success of its student population through a rigorous, positive, and transformative educational experience. CSU is committed to teaching, research, service and community development including social justice, leadership and entrepreneurship. For more information, visit www.csu.edu.

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Pictured (left to right): Indonesia Jackson (Pine Bluff School District), Jada Lambert (Friendship Aspire Academy Southeast Arkansas Prep), Aaliyah Handy (Watson Chapel School District), Freddiemae Thompson (Dollarway High School District).

PINE BLUFF, AR – The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB), hosted a historic Signing Day on Wednesday, welcoming four valedictorians from local high schools in Pine Bluff and Jefferson County.

The four women, Freddiemae Thompson, Aaliyah Handy, Jada Lambert, and Indonesia Jackson, signed commitments to enrolling at UAPB in the fall.

The students’ enrollment marks a historic moment for the university, as it’s the first that Valedictorians from all Pine Bluff High Schools have chosen to enroll at UAPB. Vice Chancellor of Enrollment Management and Student Success, Dr. Braque Talley, Sr. credits the university’s campus-wide commitment to excellence.

“We are excited about welcoming these extraordinary students this is a monumental for UAPB and the community – keeping our talent here,” said Dr. Talley.

Amanda Kirklin, the scholarship coordinator at the university echoed Talley’s comments, “We want our local students to know that UAPB is a viable option.”

This fall, the young women plan to study in various fields including nursing, business, and law. In addition all four students have been award a full scholarship to the university.

“We must work to attract and retain top talent in our state and help make lasting, transformative investments in our future students and local schools that will have positive impacts for generations,” said George Cotton, Sr., Vice Chancellor of Institutional Advancement.

“Not only did these scholars perform well academically, but they performed well during a pandemic; this validates their strength and commitment to their goals,” said Donna Ryles, Director of Recruitment at UAPB.

As part of the Class of 2021, the women excelled in their academics and received the highest grade point average (GPA) at their high schools.

Freddiemae Thompson of Dollarway High School

Miss Thompson plans to major in biology and has plans to become a doctor or an entrepreneur. She would like to established a privately-owned healthcare facility called Thompson Care.

Aaliyah Handy of Watson Chapel High School

Miss Handy plans to major in nursing. She wants to work in the medical field and plans to become a registered nurse.

Jada Lambert of Friendship Aspire Academy

Miss Lambert plans to major in nursing and would like to pursue her passion for taking care of others by becoming a registered nurse.

Indonesia Jackson of Pine Bluff High School

Miss Jackson plans to major in English with a minor in Political Science. She plans to attend Law School and become a criminal or civil attorney.

About the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) is an 1890 Land-Grant HBCU with a diverse student population, competitive degree offerings, and stellar faculty. For more than 140 years, UAPB has worked to create an environment that emphasizes learning, growth, and productivity while affording a basic need to its students: a chance to advance. UAPB offers certificate and associate degree programs, more than 40 undergraduate and master’s degree programs, and a doctoral program in Aquaculture/Fisheries. Students are active in more than 100 organizations, including an internationally renowned Vesper Choir, Marching Musical Machine of the Mid-South Band, concert bands, wind symphony, and an accomplished athletics program. For more information, visit www.uapb.edu.

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The Charlotte Sports Foundation (CSF) announced that North Carolina A&T State University will play North Carolina Central University in the Duke’s Mayo Classic to open the 2022 season. Exact dates and times along with events information will be released in the future.

100 Black Men of Greater Charlotte and the Leon Frank Agency will be partnering with CSF for the matchup, working on events and business development.

Next year’s game will be the third time that the 97-year rivalry has been played in Charlotte, and just the second time since 1990. The two teams played at Memorial Stadium on October 4, 2008 in front of 20″,180 fans. The teams also played in Charlotte in 1990.

The rivalry dates back to 1924 when NC A&T tied NCCU, 13-13, in Durham, North Carolina. The Aggies lead the series 52-34-5. NC A&T has won 21 of the last 29 meetings. NCCU has won seven of the last 14 contests, including three of the last six, but the Aggies have three straight victories over the Eagles,

“We are very proud to bring the storied rivalry of NC A&T and NC Central to Charlotte in 2022 and 2027 for the Duke’s Mayo Classic,” said Danny Morrison, Executive Director of the Charlotte Sports Foundation. “Hosting such a longstanding rivalry between two HBCU schools is an honor and privilege for CSF, our partners, and the city of Charlotte. We look forward to working with 100 Black Men of Charlotte and the Leon Frank Agency to impact the community through new initiatives and events around the games. We are excited to welcome Aggies and Eagles fans to the Queen City for great fun and football to kick off the 2022 and 2027 season.”

“We are thrilled about this opportunity to compete in Charlotte at Bank of America Stadium,” said Dr. Ingrid Wicker McCree, NCCU Director of Athletics. “This will be a fantastic experience for our student-athletics, students, university community and fans. We have a solid alumni and fan base in the greater Charlotte area and we are excited about bringing this game to their back yard. We want to thank the team from Charlotte Sports Foundation for hosting this event for these two great institutions.”

“Duke’s Mayo partnered with the Charlotte Sports Foundation to help create impact and add our southern favor in the communities that have supported us for over 100 years,” said Joe Tuza, President & “Captain Condiment” at Sauer Brands Inc. “This is an exciting rivalry and we’re looking forward to NC A&T and NCCU in the 2022 Duke’s Mayo Classic game.”

“Tepper Sports & Entertainment is thrilled to host this historic rivalry at Bank of American Stadium to kick off the 2022 and 2027 college football season,” said Tom Glick, president of Tepper Sports & Entertainment. “Welcoming this game back to Charlotte for the first time in more than a decade is great for the city, the schools and fans.”

About the Charlotte Sports Foundation
The mission of the Charlotte Sports Foundation (CSF), a 501(c)(3), is to provide leadership for sports-based initiatives that result in a positive impact on the economy and quality of life in the Charlotte region. CSF?was created in the spring of 2013 as a combined entity of Charlotte’s two primary sports development groups, Charlotte Collegiate Football and the Charlotte Regional Sports Commission. Its origins can be traced to the vision of Charlotte civic leaders after the very successful hosting of the 1994 NCAA Men’s Final Four.

The Foundation also provides support for recruitment and operation of other local sporting events, and spearheads Charlotte’s continued growth as a preferred host for premier national and regional sporting events. CSF’s future regular season football games scheduled include: East Carolina University vs. Appalachian State University and the University of Georgia vs. Clemson University (2021), the Universities of North Carolina and South Carolina (2023), and the University of Tennessee against West Virginia University (2028).

The Board of Directors that guides the Charlotte Sports Foundation boasts a dynamic roster of top Charlotte civic and business leaders. Please visit www.CharlotteSports.org for more information.

About 100 Black Men of America, Inc.
100 Black Men was founded as an organization in New York City in 1963. The national organization, 100 Black Men of America, Inc. began with nine chapters in 1986 as a national alliance of leading African American men of business, public affairs and government with a mission to improve the quality of life for African Americans, particularly African American youth. These visionaries included businessmen and industry leaders such as David Dinkins, Robert Mangum, Dr. William Hayling, Nathaniel Goldston III, Livingston Wingate Andrew Hatcher, and Jackie Robinson. Since inception, the vision emerged and grew to over 10,000 members impacting over 125,000 underserved, underrepresented minority youth annually. Visit www.100blackmen.org for more information on the programs and initiatives of 100 Black Men of America, Inc. and their global network of chapters.

100 Black Men of Greater Charlotte, Inc. improves the quality of life for the communities it serves. Mentoring is the core service delivery of The 100, the largest network of African American male mentors in the nation. It influences and transforms the lives of underrepresented and disenfranchised youth, with a focus on African American youth. Through the platform of Mentoring The 100 Way®, across a lifetime, it provides programmatic services in education, health and wellness, economic empowerment and leadership development, which makes a fundamental difference in the lives of the youths it touches and the communities it serves.

About Leon Frank Agency
The Leon Frank Agency was founded in 2018 with one goal in mind: help HBCU Athletic departments, programming, and events take their opportunities to the next level. With over 20 years of experience in sports marketing, partnership development, advertising, and social media, it is here for the HBCU Culture. It aims to develop unique experiences for partners and clients to engage with the current HBCU Landscape.

About Duke’s Mayonnaise
Duke’s Mayonnaise was created in 1917 in Greenville, SC by Eugenia Duke. In addition to the flagship mayonnaise, which is still made according to Eugenia’s original recipe, Duke’s offers light, olive oil, and flavored mayonnaises, tartar sauce, sandwich relish and regionally-inspired Duke’s Southern Sauces and dressings. For more information, visit www.dukesmayo.com.

Duke’s Mayonnaise is owned by Sauer Brands, Inc., which was founded as The C.F. Sauer Company in 1887 in Richmond, Virginia. The company produces a broad line of inspired flavors to excite and delight consumers in the condiments, spices, seasonings and extracts categories. The company’s manufacturing facilities include locations in Richmond, Virginia; Greenville, South Carolina; New Century, Kansas; San Luis Obispo, California, and Elk Grove Village, Illinois. Besides Duke’s Mayonnaise, the company’s brands include The Spice Hunter, Sauer’s, Gold Medal, BAMA, Kernel Seasons, and Tasty Shakes. Sauer Brands also produces high-quality private-label products for the retail and foodservice channels. Learn more at sauerbrands.com.

WASHINGTON, DC – Howard University School of Law has been awarded a $10 million grant from the Jerome L. Greene Foundation for the creation and support of the Greene Public Service Scholars Program. The program, a partnership between the foundation and Howard law school, will support and cultivate exceptional law students committed to a career in public service law.

“On behalf of the entire Howard University community, I’d like to extend our sincere appreciation to the Jerome L. Greene Foundation for their generous, transformative $10 million gift to establish the Greene Public Service Scholars Program at Howard University School of Law,” said President Wayne A.I. Frederick, M.D. MBA. “Howard law students train here for nurturing, cultural, experience and because they want to be of service to their community. However, expenses can be a barrier to pursuing critical careers in industries like public service. This gift will alleviate the financial burden for our future servant leaders who want to pursue passion over profit.”

The Jerome L. Greene Foundation grant, the largest donation in history of the Howard University School of Law, is an important part of the foundation’s Racial Equity Initiative, which is an investment in the future of American society by providing support to highly qualified Black lawyers committed to public service. Recipients of the Greene Public Service Scholars Program will receive a three-year, full-tuition scholarship. The program will also feature a full program on public interest law, including lectures and other programming as well as mentoring by prominent public interest lawyers. The Greene Scholars will also receive training through Summer placements at large law firms, such as Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison. Four students will receive the Greene Public Service Scholarship each year. The first scholarships will be awarded in Fall 2021 for Howard law students entering the Class of 2024.

“Howard University School of Law is enormously thankful to the Jerome L. Greene Foundation for this grant to create the Greene Public Service Scholars Program,” said Danielle Holley-Walker, dean of the Howard University School of Law. “This gift, the largest in law school history, goes to the heart of Howard law’s mission to create a generation of new attorneys who are lawyer-leaders deeply committed to public service. These scholarships will transform the lives and careers of many of our students, students who choose Howard law because of our commitment to racial justice. These scholarships will relieve student debt and allow our law students to pursue their careers in service to their communities.

“Our hope is that these funds help Howard University School of Law deepen its commitment to educating the best legal minds to work for underserved communities and fight for social justice,” said Chris Mclnerney, president and CEO of the Jerome L. Greene Foundation. “The Green Public Service Scholars will acquire advocacy skills, public interest experience, and benefit from exposure to lawyers who have contributed to civil and human rights by deploying the law for positive social change.”

The grant will help to further address the need to expand the number of Black public interest lawyers. According to the American Bar Association, 5 percent of all attorneys across the U.S. are African-American. While a large number of law students enter law students enter law school with the intent of pursing careers in public interest lawyering, many change their minds over time, often because of the staggering price of a legal education. Even at an institution like Howard, where there is a commitment to keeping costs down, public interest salaries have failed to keep up with the increase in law school debt. According to a 2018 press release from the National Association of Law Placement,”… salaries for public service attorneys have risen modestly since 2004, but among attorneys working in civil legal services organizations, as public defenders or local prosecuting attorneys, or as attorneys in public interest organizations, those providing civil legal services have the lowest median entry-level salary, earn the smallest increases in salary based on experience, and have seen the slowest growth in salary levels over the past 14 years. “While median 2018 starting salaries in the private sector ranged from $90,000-$190,000, the median salary in the public sector is $48,000. After five years of practice, that median rises to $205,000 at law firms compared to $54,800 at public interest foundations.

“The generous gift of the Jerome L. Greene Foundation allows talented Howard law students to work in furtherance of their commitments to serving in the public interest and engaging in the fight for social justice, said Carmia N. Caesar, assistant dean of career services, Howard University School of Law. “The greatest need for legal services is on behalf of individuals who rely on free or reduced cost legal services. These are precisely the attorneys that the Greene Public Service Scholars Program will produce. Without the foundation’s support, social justice careers become a privilege attainable only to students with the financial backing to emerge from college and law school without debt. The Greene Public Service Scholars Program returns this right to the passionate, dedicated social engineers who come to Howard University School of Law to advance the human condition.”

For more information about Howard University School of Law, visit http://law.howard.edu.

About Howard University
Founded in 1867, Howard University is a private, research university that is comprised of 13 schools and colleges. Students pursue more than 140 programs of study leading to undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees. The University operates with a commitment to Excellence in Truth and Service and has produced one Schwarzman Scholar, three Marshall Scholars, four Rhodes Scholars, 12 Truman produces more on-campus African American Ph.D. recipients than any other university in the United States. For more information on Howard University, visit www.howard.edu.

About Jerome L. Greene Foundation
In 1978, Jerome L. Green established the foundation to give back to his native New York and beyond by supporting transformative organizations dedicated to the betterment of society. Today, the foundation furthers his vision by supporting exemplary programs that advances human achievement in science, medicine and the law, and by encouraging tomorrow’s leaders in the arts and social justice.